Discussion:
Tandy 102 and Windows XP
(too old to reply)
JUST ME
2003-12-17 01:15:26 UTC
Permalink
Does anyone know, or know someone who, that can comfirm that this Tandy 102 setup will function with Windows XP?
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Richard Larson
2003-12-17 01:38:03 UTC
Permalink
Well for what it's worth, I can get my model 100 to talk to my windows xp
box using a null modem cable. Don't know how my cable is wired, supposed to
be a null modem cable, bought it on Ebay.

----- Original Message -----
From: "JUST ME" <heapbigchief-***@public.gmane.org>
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Sent: Tuesday, December 16, 2003 7:15 PM
Subject: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by JUST ME
Does anyone know, or know someone who, that can comfirm that this Tandy
102 setup will function with Windows XP?
Post by JUST ME
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JUST ME
2003-12-17 02:12:21 UTC
Permalink
Ok. Thanks. I was going to get one of those complink cables from Club 100. If the 100 talks to XP I suppose the 102 will. I was told that WinXP is not a true DOS environment so I have no idea whether I am going through this expense for a valid reason or not. If I had a dual use for that cable I would not mind but if it doesn't work I'm stuck with something I got no use for so I'm trying to get confirmation that I'm on the right track.


----- Original Message -----
From: "Richard Larson" <rlarson-CBFwbMb/FCFWk0Htik3J/***@public.gmane.org>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 19:38:03 -0600
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Richard Larson
Well for what it's worth, I can get my model 100 to talk to my windows xp
box using a null modem cable. Don't know how my cable is wired, supposed to
be a null modem cable, bought it on Ebay.
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, December 16, 2003 7:15 PM
Subject: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by JUST ME
Does anyone know, or know someone who, that can comfirm that this Tandy
102 setup will function with Windows XP?
Post by JUST ME
--
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Rick Hanson
2003-12-17 02:24:42 UTC
Permalink
<x-flowed>
Oh no way, man. No one ever gets "stuck" at Club 100. Let ease your
mind. If you get a cable from me and it does not work, you may return it
for a full refund including the shipping. After all, this is a users group
first and foremost. -Rick-
Post by JUST ME
Ok. Thanks. I was going to get one of those complink cables from Club 100.
If the 100 talks to XP I suppose the 102 will. I was told that WinXP is
not a true DOS environment so I have no idea whether I am going through
this expense for a valid reason or not. If I had a dual use for that cable
I would not mind but if it doesn't work I'm stuck with something I got no
use for so I'm trying to get confirmation that I'm on the right track.
</x-flowed>
Neil Morrison
2003-12-17 02:49:24 UTC
Permalink
As long as your XP has a terminal emulator you should be able to
perform M100 transfers. DOS is not required.

Go to http://www.hilgraeve.com and download the free upgrade to
connect with. It has better functionality than the one supplied with
Windoze.

NM

----- Original Message -----
Post by JUST ME
Ok. Thanks. I was going to get one of those complink cables from
Club 100. If the 100 talks to XP I suppose the 102 will. I was told
that WinXP is not a true DOS environment so I have no idea whether I
am going through this expense for a valid reason or not. If I had a
dual use for that cable I would not mind but if it doesn't work I'm
stuck with something I got no use for so I'm trying to get
confirmation that I'm on the right track.
JD Erskine
2003-12-17 02:32:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by JUST ME
Does anyone know, or know someone who, that can comfirm that this Tandy
102 setup will function with Windows XP?
Post by JUST ME
--
WinXP Service Pack 2. The Tandy? BASIC, as usual.
Greetings "Just Me",

I think the gang's being rather thorough with respect to your query re the
necessary cabling to help make your experience work. You've asked if anyone
can confirm it will work, no one knows - because there are any number of
strange things that can happen. Is it likely to work, yes. Will it work the
first time, possibly. If not right away will it work eventually, likely.

You can help the list help you by identifying what software you will be
running on/under your WinXP and if you have any software identified for use
on the Model T. It's the application (software) and the application (your
intent) that we need to know about.

XP is an OS and BASIC is a programming language. I'm not a guru here with
this box, by any stretch, nor with XP, just noting this apparently missing
piece of info.

What do you expect or hope it will do? Arguably most folks are looking to
transfer data from the Model T to the PC either as a file transfer or
having the PC mimic the portable disk drive - so storage. The other chief
activity could be said to be transferring programs to the Model T from the
PC that they have downloaded. Are these things you wish to do?

Cheers, JD
JUST ME
2003-12-17 02:32:53 UTC
Permalink
I didn't mean it to come out sounding like that. Sorry.

----- Original Message -----
From: Rick Hanson <rick-***@public.gmane.org>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 18:24:42 -0800
To: m100-***@public.gmane.org, m100-***@public.gmane.org
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Rick Hanson
Oh no way, man. No one ever gets "stuck" at Club 100. Let ease your
mind. If you get a cable from me and it does not work, you may return it
for a full refund including the shipping. After all, this is a users group
first and foremost. -Rick-
Post by JUST ME
Ok. Thanks. I was going to get one of those complink cables from Club 100.
If the 100 talks to XP I suppose the 102 will. I was told that WinXP is
not a true DOS environment so I have no idea whether I am going through
this expense for a valid reason or not. If I had a dual use for that cable
I would not mind but if it doesn't work I'm stuck with something I got no
use for so I'm trying to get confirmation that I'm on the right track.
--
___________________________________________________________
Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com
http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm
Rick Hanson
2003-12-17 02:58:31 UTC
Permalink
<x-flowed>
Post by JUST ME
I didn't mean it to come out sounding like that. Sorry.
Hey that's cool. No biggie. You are absolutely OKAY, okay? Over the last
20 years I have heard much, MUCH greater expressions of frustration. I
have often wished that I could beam myself over to help each person,
individually. But alas, that makes good science fiction but is not a reality.


</x-flowed>
JUST ME
2003-12-17 03:44:23 UTC
Permalink
Ok. What is a "terminal emulator" and what is an "M100 transfer"?



----- Original Message -----
From: "Neil Morrison" <neilsmorr-***@public.gmane.org>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 18:49:24 -0800
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Neil Morrison
As long as your XP has a terminal emulator you should be able to
perform M100 transfers. DOS is not required.
Go to http://www.hilgraeve.com and download the free upgrade to
connect with. It has better functionality than the one supplied with
Windoze.
NM
----- Original Message -----
Post by JUST ME
Ok. Thanks. I was going to get one of those complink cables from
Club 100. If the 100 talks to XP I suppose the 102 will. I was told
that WinXP is not a true DOS environment so I have no idea whether I
am going through this expense for a valid reason or not. If I had a
dual use for that cable I would not mind but if it doesn't work I'm
stuck with something I got no use for so I'm trying to get
confirmation that I'm on the right track.
--
___________________________________________________________
Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com
http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm
Neil Morrison
2003-12-17 04:01:00 UTC
Permalink
----- Original Message -----
Post by JUST ME
Ok. What is a "terminal emulator" and what is an "M100 transfer"?
"terminal emulator" = Hyperterminal

"M100 transfer" - transfer of a file from / to a Model 100

If you poke around on

http://forums.compuserve.com/vlforums/default.asp?SRV=VintageComputing

you may be able to find a binary transfer program for the M100.
You'll certainly find some interesting stuff. I assume you've had a
thorough look on the Club100 site.

NM
JUST ME
2003-12-17 04:19:13 UTC
Permalink
A hyper terminal. Is that a 9 pin serial port?

I have a 102. I don't want to put files on the 102. I wish to take my 102 out of the house to write on then move the file to the XP when I get home.


----- Original Message -----
From: "Neil Morrison" <neilsmorr-***@public.gmane.org>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 20:01:00 -0800
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Richard Larson
----- Original Message -----
Post by JUST ME
Ok. What is a "terminal emulator" and what is an "M100 transfer"?
"terminal emulator" = Hyperterminal
"M100 transfer" - transfer of a file from / to a Model 100
If you poke around on
http://forums.compuserve.com/vlforums/default.asp?SRV=VintageComputing
you may be able to find a binary transfer program for the M100.
You'll certainly find some interesting stuff. I assume you've had a
thorough look on the Club100 site.
NM
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Neil Morrison
2003-12-17 04:29:43 UTC
Permalink
Software.

C:\Program Files\Accessories\HyperTerminal\Hypertrm.exe

NM

----- Original Message -----
Post by JUST ME
A hyper terminal. Is that a 9 pin serial port?
I have a 102. I don't want to put files on the 102. I wish to take
my 102 out of the house to write on then move the file to the XP when
I get home.
JUST ME
2003-12-17 04:59:42 UTC
Permalink
Yep. Got that.

HyperTerminalHyperTerminal is a program that you can use to connect to other computers, Telnet sites, bulletin board systems (BBSs), online services, and host computers, using either your modem or a null modem cable:

For help with specific tasks, see How to.
For general background information, see Concepts.
For problem-solving instructions, see Troubleshooting.

Plus I have: HYPERTRM.EXE-005E8A53.pf that is listed as opening with an "unknown application".

What do I put into the area that wants: "Enter a name and choose an icon for the connection."




----- Original Message -----
From: "Neil Morrison" <neilsmorr-***@public.gmane.org>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 20:29:43 -0800
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Neil Morrison
Software.
C:\Program Files\Accessories\HyperTerminal\Hypertrm.exe
NM
----- Original Message -----
Post by JUST ME
A hyper terminal. Is that a 9 pin serial port?
I have a 102. I don't want to put files on the 102. I wish to take
my 102 out of the house to write on then move the file to the XP when
I get home.
--
___________________________________________________________
Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com
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Neil Morrison
2003-12-17 05:03:41 UTC
Permalink
----- Original Message -----
Post by JUST ME
What do I put into the area that wants: "Enter a name and choose an icon for the connection."
"Model100" and any icon you like the look of.

NM
JUST ME
2003-12-17 05:44:50 UTC
Permalink
...........It's the application (software) and the application (your
intent) that we need to know about.........
I will be using teeny.exe and Desklink.

My application or purpose that I will be using this Tandy 102 for is: I can use it to do my writing in portable fashion, away from home, library, woods, moon, where ever I may find myself.

Then, upload my writing from the Tandy 102 to my modern every day computer in order to keep my second novel under construction.




----- Original Message -----
From: JD Erskine <VA7OTC-***@public.gmane.org>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 18:32:10 -0800
To: m100-***@public.gmane.org
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by JUST ME
Does anyone know, or know someone who, that can comfirm that this Tandy
102 setup will function with Windows XP?
Post by JUST ME
--
WinXP Service Pack 2. The Tandy? BASIC, as usual.
Greetings "Just Me",
I think the gang's being rather thorough with respect to your query re the
necessary cabling to help make your experience work. You've asked if anyone
can confirm it will work, no one knows - because there are any number of
strange things that can happen. Is it likely to work, yes. Will it work the
first time, possibly. If not right away will it work eventually, likely.
You can help the list help you by identifying what software you will be
running on/under your WinXP and if you have any software identified for use
on the Model T. It's the application (software) and the application (your
intent) that we need to know about.
XP is an OS and BASIC is a programming language. I'm not a guru here with
this box, by any stretch, nor with XP, just noting this apparently missing
piece of info.
What do you expect or hope it will do? Arguably most folks are looking to
transfer data from the Model T to the PC either as a file transfer or
having the PC mimic the portable disk drive - so storage. The other chief
activity could be said to be transferring programs to the Model T from the
PC that they have downloaded. Are these things you wish to do?
Cheers, JD
--
___________________________________________________________
Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com
http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm
Ron Wiesen
2003-12-17 12:55:46 UTC
Permalink
Good. Now we know your plan. The null-modem drawings (Preferred or
Typical) will meet the requirements of DeskLink at the PC COM port and
TEENY.CO at the Model 102 RS-232C port. So the null-modem cable issue has
been put to rest.

Your PC operating system (Op Sys) is Windows XP. Fine. That's not an
issue. The TEENY and DeskLink combination haas been used by folks with
sundry flavors of Windows Op Sys (Win95, Win98, WinNT, Win2000, and so on ad
nauseam). So the Op Sys of your PC is not an issue.

The COM port(s) of your PC may be an issue. DeskLink has the more
restrictive requirement: COM1 or COM2 port must be available. TEENY.EXE has
the less restrictive requirement: COM1, COM2, COM3, or COM4 port must be
available. Because you intend to use DeskLink as the slave disk device of
TEENY, either the COM1 or the COM2 serial port harware must exist in your PC
and that hardware must be assigned to a connector (e.g., DB9) where you can
attach the null-modem cable. The COM port issue confuses many folks. Fear
not. You can use TEENY.EXE experimentally to determine which COM ports
exist. By itself (no attached null-modem cable, no Tandy laptop) TEENY.EXE
will determine which COM ports exist, by experiment. The results of four
experimental attempts with TEENY.EXE will clarify the COM port picture of
your PC. See the command line invocations of TEENY.EXE shown below.
TEENY /4
TEENY /3
TEENY /2
TEENY /1
For each, the PC screen instructs you to attach a null-modem cable and
invoke BASIC at the Tandy laptop and type something. Ignore all that --
this is an experiment. The PC screen also shows another instruction which
you do follow -- At PC, press any key to begin a boot load of TEENY into the
laptop. Do it -- press any key and see what happens next.

One of three things happens next. Watch the PC screen. #1 -- Where you
immediately get the message "COMn port hardware not equipped." you know with
certainty that particular COM port hardware (where n is a digit 4, 3, 2, or
1) does not exist in your PC. #2 -- Where you get no message at all
(unlikely) you know with certainty that particular COM port hardware does
exist but, unfortunately, it is assigned to some internal device (e.g., a
modem) rather than to a connector where you could attach the null-modem
cable. #3 -- Where you immediately get the message "Checking for presence
of a Tandy laptop." and shortly afterwards get the message "Can't detect
laptop." you know with certainty that particular COM port hardware does
exist and likely is assigned to a connector where you could attach the
null-modem cable.

You are interested in obtaining response #3. So if you get response #3 for
either the TEENY /2 or TEENY /1 command line invocations of TEENY.EXE then
use of DeskLink is viable. In other words, the COM1 port or COM2 port
exists (a DeskLink requirement). But if you get response #3 exclusively for
the TEENY /4 or TEENY /3 command line invocations of TEENY.EXE then you can
acquire TEENY.CO but it can't be used with DeskLink (must use TEENY.CO with
a Tandy Portable Disk Drive).

Do the experiment and resolve the issue about COM port(s) of your PC.

-= Ron =-

----- Original Message -----
From: "JUST ME" <heapbigchief-***@public.gmane.org>
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 12:44 AM
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
...........It's the application (software) and the application (your
intent) that we need to know about.........
I will be using teeny.exe and Desklink.
My application or purpose that I will be using this Tandy 102 for is: I
can use it to do my writing in portable fashion, away from home, library,
woods, moon, where ever I may find myself.
Then, upload my writing from the Tandy 102 to my modern every day computer
in order to keep my second novel under construction.
----- Original Message -----
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 18:32:10 -0800
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by JUST ME
Does anyone know, or know someone who, that can comfirm that this Tandy
102 setup will function with Windows XP?
Post by JUST ME
--
WinXP Service Pack 2. The Tandy? BASIC, as usual.
Greetings "Just Me",
I think the gang's being rather thorough with respect to your query re the
necessary cabling to help make your experience work. You've asked if anyone
can confirm it will work, no one knows - because there are any number of
strange things that can happen. Is it likely to work, yes. Will it work the
first time, possibly. If not right away will it work eventually, likely.
You can help the list help you by identifying what software you will be
running on/under your WinXP and if you have any software identified for use
on the Model T. It's the application (software) and the application (your
intent) that we need to know about.
XP is an OS and BASIC is a programming language. I'm not a guru here with
this box, by any stretch, nor with XP, just noting this apparently missing
piece of info.
What do you expect or hope it will do? Arguably most folks are looking to
transfer data from the Model T to the PC either as a file transfer or
having the PC mimic the portable disk drive - so storage. The other chief
activity could be said to be transferring programs to the Model T from the
PC that they have downloaded. Are these things you wish to do?
Cheers, JD
--
___________________________________________________________
Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com
http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm
Ron Hudson
2003-12-17 22:08:37 UTC
Permalink
<x-flowed>
Post by Ron Wiesen
Good. Now we know your plan. The null-modem drawings (Preferred or
Typical) will meet the requirements of DeskLink at the PC COM port and
TEENY.CO at the Model 102 RS-232C port. So the null-modem cable issue has
been put to rest.
Your PC operating system (Op Sys) is Windows XP. Fine. That's not an
issue. The TEENY and DeskLink combination haas been used by folks with
sundry flavors of Windows Op Sys (Win95, Win98, WinNT, Win2000, and so on ad
nauseam). So the Op Sys of your PC is not an issue.
Can your desktop boot from a floppy? If you setup a floppy with DOS 6.x
and
reboot your desktop with it... do you have regular serial ports?

As long as you have regular serial ports and a bootable A: drive you
can setup
a Floppy with Desklink on it. I have done this (although the floppy is
MIA at
the moment [:^( ] ).



</x-flowed>
Ron Wiesen
2003-12-18 00:20:10 UTC
Permalink
Hello Rod:

Oh my God! You are indirectly revealing Bill Gates' long kept secret. The
(no longer) secret is: deep down under the hood of every flavor of Windoze,
where the rubber meets the road, you find (wait for it folks)..... QDOS
(Quick & Dirty Operating System).

A very long time ago Bill Gates purchased QDOS. He needed "some operating
system" so he could sell his BASIC interpreter to IBM. IBM was under the
illusion that Bill Gates had developed both a BASIC interpreter and an
operating system to support it. Bill hit up his dad for some bucks and went
a few blocks to see his friend (who shall ever remain nameless) about
purchasing all rights to QDOS. Bucks were paid and Bill Gates became the
owner (never the developer) of QDOS. This cinched his deal with IBM. First
came a cosmetic name change -- QDOS became MS-DOS (MicroSoft Disk Operating
System). Then followed minor tinkering: DOS 2.0, DOS 3.0, and so on.
Around DOS 3.2 or thereabouts the tinkering caused more dysfunction than
function such that later versions of MS-DOS started to p... me off. Around
DOS 6.0 it got real dysfunctional -- I got fully p...ed off.

Meanwhile back at MicroSoft, a few top folks with court order in hand paid a
visit to MacIntosh headquarters. They peeked at all of the MacIntosh stuff
under development. They were surprised to find an honest-to-goodness
operating system that was graphical. Returning to MicroSoft headquarters
they immediately began developing a graphical shell environment to sit atop
DOS. They called it Windows. They still call it Windows. It still is not
an operating system. Under the hood you still find an operating system --
QDOS.

The rest of the story now is history.

-= Ron =-

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ron Hudson" <ron.hudson-***@public.gmane.org>
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 5:08 PM
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Ron Hudson
Post by Ron Wiesen
Good. Now we know your plan. The null-modem drawings (Preferred or
Typical) will meet the requirements of DeskLink at the PC COM port and
TEENY.CO at the Model 102 RS-232C port. So the null-modem cable issue has
been put to rest.
Your PC operating system (Op Sys) is Windows XP. Fine. That's not an
issue. The TEENY and DeskLink combination haas been used by folks with
sundry flavors of Windows Op Sys (Win95, Win98, WinNT, Win2000, and so on ad
nauseam). So the Op Sys of your PC is not an issue.
Can your desktop boot from a floppy? If you setup a floppy with DOS 6.x
and
reboot your desktop with it... do you have regular serial ports?
As long as you have regular serial ports and a bootable A: drive you
can setup
a Floppy with Desklink on it. I have done this (although the floppy is
MIA at
the moment [:^( ] ).
w***@public.gmane.org
2003-12-18 10:31:23 UTC
Permalink
Ron forgot the art about how Bill got Apple to pay him to steal the basics
for windows from them, after they bought it from Xerox. After Bill did his
thing at Apple, and while waiting for the air to clear a little he went to
IBM and convinced them to pay him big bucks for another operating system.
Once he had prooved the viability of GUI with OS/2 1.1 Bill took off, taking
all the candy that others had paid for with him. IBM continued with OS/2,
and from versions 2.3 forward it was a very stable, actual multi-tasking
platform with very few limits. I used it on a 386 machine with 4 megs of
ram. Could simultaneously send output to three printers from three
different programs, and be working in a fourth.

73 es cul

wb3fup
a Salty Bear




----- Original Message -----
Wrom: GAUTFJMVRESKPNKMBIPBARHDMNNSKVFV
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 19:20
Subject: Under the hood -- Was: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Ron Wiesen
Oh my God! You are indirectly revealing Bill Gates' long kept secret.
The
(no longer) secret is: deep down under the hood of every flavor of Windoze,
where the rubber meets the road, you find (wait for it folks)..... QDOS
(Quick & Dirty Operating System).
A very long time ago Bill Gates purchased QDOS. He needed "some operating
system" so he could sell his BASIC interpreter to IBM. IBM was under the
illusion that Bill Gates had developed both a BASIC interpreter and an
operating system to support it. Bill hit up his dad for some bucks and went
a few blocks to see his friend (who shall ever remain nameless) about
purchasing all rights to QDOS. Bucks were paid and Bill Gates became the
owner (never the developer) of QDOS. This cinched his deal with IBM.
First
came a cosmetic name change -- QDOS became MS-DOS (MicroSoft Disk Operating
System). Then followed minor tinkering: DOS 2.0, DOS 3.0, and so on.
Around DOS 3.2 or thereabouts the tinkering caused more dysfunction than
function such that later versions of MS-DOS started to p... me off.
Around
DOS 6.0 it got real dysfunctional -- I got fully p...ed off.
Meanwhile back at MicroSoft, a few top folks with court order in hand paid a
visit to MacIntosh headquarters. They peeked at all of the MacIntosh stuff
under development. They were surprised to find an honest-to-goodness
operating system that was graphical. Returning to MicroSoft headquarters
they immediately began developing a graphical shell environment to sit atop
DOS. They called it Windows. They still call it Windows. It still is not
an operating system. Under the hood you still find an operating system --
QDOS.
The rest of the story now is history.
-= Ron =-
----- Original Message -----
Wrom: WRKJVZCMHVIBGDADRZFSQHYUCDDJBLVLMHAALPT
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 5:08 PM
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Ron Hudson
Post by Ron Wiesen
Good. Now we know your plan. The null-modem drawings (Preferred or
Typical) will meet the requirements of DeskLink at the PC COM port and
TEENY.CO at the Model 102 RS-232C port. So the null-modem cable issue has
been put to rest.
Your PC operating system (Op Sys) is Windows XP. Fine. That's not an
issue. The TEENY and DeskLink combination haas been used by folks with
sundry flavors of Windows Op Sys (Win95, Win98, WinNT, Win2000, and so on ad
nauseam). So the Op Sys of your PC is not an issue.
Can your desktop boot from a floppy? If you setup a floppy with DOS 6.x
and
reboot your desktop with it... do you have regular serial ports?
As long as you have regular serial ports and a bootable A: drive you
can setup
a Floppy with Desklink on it. I have done this (although the floppy is
MIA at
the moment [:^( ] ).
1234567891123456789212345678931234567894123456789512
JUST ME
2003-12-17 06:45:42 UTC
Permalink
Did that. Now it wants a country, area code and number. Below that a selection of my modem, com3, com1, TCP/IP(winsock). This thing has no com ports and the only available port is the 9 pin serial.





----- Original Message -----
From: "Neil Morrison" <neilsmorr-***@public.gmane.org>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 21:03:41 -0800
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Richard Larson
----- Original Message -----
Post by JUST ME
What do I put into the area that wants: "Enter a name and choose an
icon for the connection."
"Model100" and any icon you like the look of.
NM
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Neil Morrison
2003-12-17 06:59:36 UTC
Permalink
----- Original Message -----
Post by JUST ME
Did that. Now it wants a country, area code and number. Below that
a selection of my modem, com3, com1, TCP/IP(winsock). This thing has
no com ports and the only available port is the 9 pin serial.

Probably Com3 (Com 1 and Com3 are kind of the same - they use the
same interrupts). The 9 pin serial is a Com port, but you usually
have to screw around to figure out which one works. Ironically the
Model 100 is the very best tool to do this. Run Hyperterminal on the
XP and Term on the M100, put both computers into the same mode
(typically 9600 baud, 8 bits, 1 stop bit, No parity) and see if what
you type on one shows up on the other. It's usually a PITA to get it
to work, but with luck it will.

Neil
JUST ME
2003-12-17 15:37:08 UTC
Permalink
10-4, copy and paste that.



----- Original Message -----
From: "Neil Morrison" <neilsmorr-***@public.gmane.org>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 22:59:36 -0800
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Richard Larson
----- Original Message -----
Post by JUST ME
Did that. Now it wants a country, area code and number. Below that
a selection of my modem, com3, com1, TCP/IP(winsock). This thing has
no com ports and the only available port is the 9 pin serial.
Probably Com3 (Com 1 and Com3 are kind of the same - they use the
same interrupts). The 9 pin serial is a Com port, but you usually
have to screw around to figure out which one works. Ironically the
Model 100 is the very best tool to do this. Run Hyperterminal on the
XP and Term on the M100, put both computers into the same mode
(typically 9600 baud, 8 bits, 1 stop bit, No parity) and see if what
you type on one shows up on the other. It's usually a PITA to get it
to work, but with luck it will.
Neil
--
___________________________________________________________
Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com
http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm
JUST ME
2003-12-17 15:48:11 UTC
Permalink
Will do.


----- Original Message -----
From: "Ron Wiesen" <ronw-***@public.gmane.org>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 07:55:46 -0500
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Ron Wiesen
Good. Now we know your plan. The null-modem drawings (Preferred or
Typical) will meet the requirements of DeskLink at the PC COM port and
TEENY.CO at the Model 102 RS-232C port. So the null-modem cable issue has
been put to rest.
Your PC operating system (Op Sys) is Windows XP. Fine. That's not an
issue. The TEENY and DeskLink combination haas been used by folks with
sundry flavors of Windows Op Sys (Win95, Win98, WinNT, Win2000, and so on ad
nauseam). So the Op Sys of your PC is not an issue.
The COM port(s) of your PC may be an issue. DeskLink has the more
restrictive requirement: COM1 or COM2 port must be available. TEENY.EXE has
the less restrictive requirement: COM1, COM2, COM3, or COM4 port must be
available. Because you intend to use DeskLink as the slave disk device of
TEENY, either the COM1 or the COM2 serial port harware must exist in your PC
and that hardware must be assigned to a connector (e.g., DB9) where you can
attach the null-modem cable. The COM port issue confuses many folks. Fear
not. You can use TEENY.EXE experimentally to determine which COM ports
exist. By itself (no attached null-modem cable, no Tandy laptop) TEENY.EXE
will determine which COM ports exist, by experiment. The results of four
experimental attempts with TEENY.EXE will clarify the COM port picture of
your PC. See the command line invocations of TEENY.EXE shown below.
TEENY /4
TEENY /3
TEENY /2
TEENY /1
For each, the PC screen instructs you to attach a null-modem cable and
invoke BASIC at the Tandy laptop and type something. Ignore all that --
this is an experiment. The PC screen also shows another instruction which
you do follow -- At PC, press any key to begin a boot load of TEENY into the
laptop. Do it -- press any key and see what happens next.
One of three things happens next. Watch the PC screen. #1 -- Where you
immediately get the message "COMn port hardware not equipped." you know with
certainty that particular COM port hardware (where n is a digit 4, 3, 2, or
1) does not exist in your PC. #2 -- Where you get no message at all
(unlikely) you know with certainty that particular COM port hardware does
exist but, unfortunately, it is assigned to some internal device (e.g., a
modem) rather than to a connector where you could attach the null-modem
cable. #3 -- Where you immediately get the message "Checking for presence
of a Tandy laptop." and shortly afterwards get the message "Can't detect
laptop." you know with certainty that particular COM port hardware does
exist and likely is assigned to a connector where you could attach the
null-modem cable.
You are interested in obtaining response #3. So if you get response #3 for
either the TEENY /2 or TEENY /1 command line invocations of TEENY.EXE then
use of DeskLink is viable. In other words, the COM1 port or COM2 port
exists (a DeskLink requirement). But if you get response #3 exclusively for
the TEENY /4 or TEENY /3 command line invocations of TEENY.EXE then you can
acquire TEENY.CO but it can't be used with DeskLink (must use TEENY.CO with
a Tandy Portable Disk Drive).
Do the experiment and resolve the issue about COM port(s) of your PC.
-= Ron =-
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 12:44 AM
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
...........It's the application (software) and the application (your
intent) that we need to know about.........
I will be using teeny.exe and Desklink.
My application or purpose that I will be using this Tandy 102 for is: I
can use it to do my writing in portable fashion, away from home, library,
woods, moon, where ever I may find myself.
Then, upload my writing from the Tandy 102 to my modern every day computer
in order to keep my second novel under construction.
----- Original Message -----
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 18:32:10 -0800
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by JUST ME
Does anyone know, or know someone who, that can comfirm that this
Tandy
102 setup will function with Windows XP?
Post by JUST ME
--
WinXP Service Pack 2. The Tandy? BASIC, as usual.
Greetings "Just Me",
I think the gang's being rather thorough with respect to your query re
the
necessary cabling to help make your experience work. You've asked if
anyone
can confirm it will work, no one knows - because there are any number of
strange things that can happen. Is it likely to work, yes. Will it work
the
first time, possibly. If not right away will it work eventually, likely.
You can help the list help you by identifying what software you will be
running on/under your WinXP and if you have any software identified for
use
on the Model T. It's the application (software) and the application
(your
intent) that we need to know about.
XP is an OS and BASIC is a programming language. I'm not a guru here
with
this box, by any stretch, nor with XP, just noting this apparently
missing
piece of info.
What do you expect or hope it will do? Arguably most folks are looking
to
transfer data from the Model T to the PC either as a file transfer or
having the PC mimic the portable disk drive - so storage. The other
chief
activity could be said to be transferring programs to the Model T from
the
PC that they have downloaded. Are these things you wish to do?
Cheers, JD
--
___________________________________________________________
Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com
http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm
--
___________________________________________________________
Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com
http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm
JUST ME
2003-12-17 16:27:47 UTC
Permalink
.....Do it -- press any key and see what happens next.....

A second or so goes by, the onboard speaker inside the puter makes the "red" noise, some type of information appears in the DOS window, then the DOS window closes.

This all happens in a fraction of a second and I cannot see what appears in the DOS window. It did this several times and it appears and disappears in almost the same instance after it checks for the Tandy. Does this function have a log I can look at?





----- Original Message -----
From: "Ron Wiesen" <ronw-***@public.gmane.org>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 07:55:46 -0500
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Ron Wiesen
Good. Now we know your plan. The null-modem drawings (Preferred or
Typical) will meet the requirements of DeskLink at the PC COM port and
TEENY.CO at the Model 102 RS-232C port. So the null-modem cable issue has
been put to rest.
Your PC operating system (Op Sys) is Windows XP. Fine. That's not an
issue. The TEENY and DeskLink combination haas been used by folks with
sundry flavors of Windows Op Sys (Win95, Win98, WinNT, Win2000, and so on ad
nauseam). So the Op Sys of your PC is not an issue.
The COM port(s) of your PC may be an issue. DeskLink has the more
restrictive requirement: COM1 or COM2 port must be available. TEENY.EXE has
the less restrictive requirement: COM1, COM2, COM3, or COM4 port must be
available. Because you intend to use DeskLink as the slave disk device of
TEENY, either the COM1 or the COM2 serial port harware must exist in your PC
and that hardware must be assigned to a connector (e.g., DB9) where you can
attach the null-modem cable. The COM port issue confuses many folks. Fear
not. You can use TEENY.EXE experimentally to determine which COM ports
exist. By itself (no attached null-modem cable, no Tandy laptop) TEENY.EXE
will determine which COM ports exist, by experiment. The results of four
experimental attempts with TEENY.EXE will clarify the COM port picture of
your PC. See the command line invocations of TEENY.EXE shown below.
TEENY /4
TEENY /3
TEENY /2
TEENY /1
For each, the PC screen instructs you to attach a null-modem cable and
invoke BASIC at the Tandy laptop and type something. Ignore all that --
this is an experiment. The PC screen also shows another instruction which
you do follow -- At PC, press any key to begin a boot load of TEENY into the
laptop. Do it -- press any key and see what happens next.
One of three things happens next. Watch the PC screen. #1 -- Where you
immediately get the message "COMn port hardware not equipped." you know with
certainty that particular COM port hardware (where n is a digit 4, 3, 2, or
1) does not exist in your PC. #2 -- Where you get no message at all
(unlikely) you know with certainty that particular COM port hardware does
exist but, unfortunately, it is assigned to some internal device (e.g., a
modem) rather than to a connector where you could attach the null-modem
cable. #3 -- Where you immediately get the message "Checking for presence
of a Tandy laptop." and shortly afterwards get the message "Can't detect
laptop." you know with certainty that particular COM port hardware does
exist and likely is assigned to a connector where you could attach the
null-modem cable.
You are interested in obtaining response #3. So if you get response #3 for
either the TEENY /2 or TEENY /1 command line invocations of TEENY.EXE then
use of DeskLink is viable. In other words, the COM1 port or COM2 port
exists (a DeskLink requirement). But if you get response #3 exclusively for
the TEENY /4 or TEENY /3 command line invocations of TEENY.EXE then you can
acquire TEENY.CO but it can't be used with DeskLink (must use TEENY.CO with
a Tandy Portable Disk Drive).
Do the experiment and resolve the issue about COM port(s) of your PC.
-= Ron =-
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 12:44 AM
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
...........It's the application (software) and the application (your
intent) that we need to know about.........
I will be using teeny.exe and Desklink.
My application or purpose that I will be using this Tandy 102 for is: I
can use it to do my writing in portable fashion, away from home, library,
woods, moon, where ever I may find myself.
Then, upload my writing from the Tandy 102 to my modern every day computer
in order to keep my second novel under construction.
----- Original Message -----
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 18:32:10 -0800
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by JUST ME
Does anyone know, or know someone who, that can comfirm that this
Tandy
102 setup will function with Windows XP?
Post by JUST ME
--
WinXP Service Pack 2. The Tandy? BASIC, as usual.
Greetings "Just Me",
I think the gang's being rather thorough with respect to your query re
the
necessary cabling to help make your experience work. You've asked if
anyone
can confirm it will work, no one knows - because there are any number of
strange things that can happen. Is it likely to work, yes. Will it work
the
first time, possibly. If not right away will it work eventually, likely.
You can help the list help you by identifying what software you will be
running on/under your WinXP and if you have any software identified for
use
on the Model T. It's the application (software) and the application
(your
intent) that we need to know about.
XP is an OS and BASIC is a programming language. I'm not a guru here
with
this box, by any stretch, nor with XP, just noting this apparently
missing
piece of info.
What do you expect or hope it will do? Arguably most folks are looking
to
transfer data from the Model T to the PC either as a file transfer or
having the PC mimic the portable disk drive - so storage. The other
chief
activity could be said to be transferring programs to the Model T from
the
PC that they have downloaded. Are these things you wish to do?
Cheers, JD
--
___________________________________________________________
Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com
http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm
--
___________________________________________________________
Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com
http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm
Jan Vanden Bossche
2003-12-17 21:59:15 UTC
Permalink
Hallo

----- Original Message -----
Post by JUST ME
This all happens in a fraction of a second and I cannot see what
appears in the DOS window. It did this several times and it
appears and disappears in almost the same instance after it
checks for the Tandy. Does this function have a log I can look at?
Try START, RUN... and type CMD. That will open a DOS-box (actually, a
command-windows) and you can type commands in there without the window
disappearing. Change to the correct drive (A: or C:) and change to the
dirrectory that contains TEENY.EXE.

Greetings from the TyRannoSaurus
Jan-80
Neil Morrison
2003-12-17 22:02:57 UTC
Permalink
Does that work on XP? I know it does on 98/ME

NM

----- Original Message -----
Post by Jan Vanden Bossche
Try START, RUN... and type CMD. That will open a DOS-box (actually, a
command-windows) and you can type commands in there without the window
disappearing. Change to the correct drive (A: or C:) and change to the
dirrectory that contains TEENY.EXE.
Jan Vanden Bossche
2003-12-18 08:31:29 UTC
Permalink
Hallo

----- Original Message -----
From: "Neil Morrison" <neilsmorr-***@public.gmane.org>
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Sent: 17 December 2003 23:02
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Neil Morrison
Does that work on XP? I know it does on 98/ME
I've done it on WinNT4. No reason why it shouldn't work on XP. Can't test it
though, cause my own machine is Win2KPro, and my serial ports are tied up.

Just try it. Should work, AFAIK.
Post by Neil Morrison
NM
----- Original Message -----
Post by Jan Vanden Bossche
Try START, RUN... and type CMD. That will open a DOS-box (actually,
a command-window) and you can type commands in there without the
window disappearing. Change to the correct drive (A: or C:) and
change to the directory that contains TEENY.EXE.
Greetings from the TyRannoSaurus
Jan-80
JUST ME
2003-12-17 16:31:54 UTC
Permalink
After the sheer repetition of it appearing for a micro second, I made out that it says, "Can't detect laptop." Then wham, the DOS window closes.


----- Original Message -----
From: "Ron Wiesen" <ronw-***@public.gmane.org>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 07:55:46 -0500
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Ron Wiesen
Good. Now we know your plan. The null-modem drawings (Preferred or
Typical) will meet the requirements of DeskLink at the PC COM port and
TEENY.CO at the Model 102 RS-232C port. So the null-modem cable issue has
been put to rest.
Your PC operating system (Op Sys) is Windows XP. Fine. That's not an
issue. The TEENY and DeskLink combination haas been used by folks with
sundry flavors of Windows Op Sys (Win95, Win98, WinNT, Win2000, and so on ad
nauseam). So the Op Sys of your PC is not an issue.
The COM port(s) of your PC may be an issue. DeskLink has the more
restrictive requirement: COM1 or COM2 port must be available. TEENY.EXE has
the less restrictive requirement: COM1, COM2, COM3, or COM4 port must be
available. Because you intend to use DeskLink as the slave disk device of
TEENY, either the COM1 or the COM2 serial port harware must exist in your PC
and that hardware must be assigned to a connector (e.g., DB9) where you can
attach the null-modem cable. The COM port issue confuses many folks. Fear
not. You can use TEENY.EXE experimentally to determine which COM ports
exist. By itself (no attached null-modem cable, no Tandy laptop) TEENY.EXE
will determine which COM ports exist, by experiment. The results of four
experimental attempts with TEENY.EXE will clarify the COM port picture of
your PC. See the command line invocations of TEENY.EXE shown below.
TEENY /4
TEENY /3
TEENY /2
TEENY /1
For each, the PC screen instructs you to attach a null-modem cable and
invoke BASIC at the Tandy laptop and type something. Ignore all that --
this is an experiment. The PC screen also shows another instruction which
you do follow -- At PC, press any key to begin a boot load of TEENY into the
laptop. Do it -- press any key and see what happens next.
One of three things happens next. Watch the PC screen. #1 -- Where you
immediately get the message "COMn port hardware not equipped." you know with
certainty that particular COM port hardware (where n is a digit 4, 3, 2, or
1) does not exist in your PC. #2 -- Where you get no message at all
(unlikely) you know with certainty that particular COM port hardware does
exist but, unfortunately, it is assigned to some internal device (e.g., a
modem) rather than to a connector where you could attach the null-modem
cable. #3 -- Where you immediately get the message "Checking for presence
of a Tandy laptop." and shortly afterwards get the message "Can't detect
laptop." you know with certainty that particular COM port hardware does
exist and likely is assigned to a connector where you could attach the
null-modem cable.
You are interested in obtaining response #3. So if you get response #3 for
either the TEENY /2 or TEENY /1 command line invocations of TEENY.EXE then
use of DeskLink is viable. In other words, the COM1 port or COM2 port
exists (a DeskLink requirement). But if you get response #3 exclusively for
the TEENY /4 or TEENY /3 command line invocations of TEENY.EXE then you can
acquire TEENY.CO but it can't be used with DeskLink (must use TEENY.CO with
a Tandy Portable Disk Drive).
Do the experiment and resolve the issue about COM port(s) of your PC.
-= Ron =-
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 12:44 AM
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
...........It's the application (software) and the application (your
intent) that we need to know about.........
I will be using teeny.exe and Desklink.
My application or purpose that I will be using this Tandy 102 for is: I
can use it to do my writing in portable fashion, away from home, library,
woods, moon, where ever I may find myself.
Then, upload my writing from the Tandy 102 to my modern every day computer
in order to keep my second novel under construction.
----- Original Message -----
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 18:32:10 -0800
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by JUST ME
Does anyone know, or know someone who, that can comfirm that this
Tandy
102 setup will function with Windows XP?
Post by JUST ME
--
WinXP Service Pack 2. The Tandy? BASIC, as usual.
Greetings "Just Me",
I think the gang's being rather thorough with respect to your query re
the
necessary cabling to help make your experience work. You've asked if
anyone
can confirm it will work, no one knows - because there are any number of
strange things that can happen. Is it likely to work, yes. Will it work
the
first time, possibly. If not right away will it work eventually, likely.
You can help the list help you by identifying what software you will be
running on/under your WinXP and if you have any software identified for
use
on the Model T. It's the application (software) and the application
(your
intent) that we need to know about.
XP is an OS and BASIC is a programming language. I'm not a guru here
with
this box, by any stretch, nor with XP, just noting this apparently
missing
piece of info.
What do you expect or hope it will do? Arguably most folks are looking
to
transfer data from the Model T to the PC either as a file transfer or
having the PC mimic the portable disk drive - so storage. The other
chief
activity could be said to be transferring programs to the Model T from
the
PC that they have downloaded. Are these things you wish to do?
Cheers, JD
--
___________________________________________________________
Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com
http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm
--
___________________________________________________________
Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com
http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm
JUST ME
2003-12-17 16:38:54 UTC
Permalink
Great, response #3. Better that it cant find laptop at this stage as compared to cannot find COM#. So it has to be the 9 pin serial. Relief.


----- Original Message -----
From: "Ron Wiesen" <ronw-***@public.gmane.org>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 07:55:46 -0500
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Ron Wiesen
Good. Now we know your plan. The null-modem drawings (Preferred or
Typical) will meet the requirements of DeskLink at the PC COM port and
TEENY.CO at the Model 102 RS-232C port. So the null-modem cable issue has
been put to rest.
Your PC operating system (Op Sys) is Windows XP. Fine. That's not an
issue. The TEENY and DeskLink combination haas been used by folks with
sundry flavors of Windows Op Sys (Win95, Win98, WinNT, Win2000, and so on ad
nauseam). So the Op Sys of your PC is not an issue.
The COM port(s) of your PC may be an issue. DeskLink has the more
restrictive requirement: COM1 or COM2 port must be available. TEENY.EXE has
the less restrictive requirement: COM1, COM2, COM3, or COM4 port must be
available. Because you intend to use DeskLink as the slave disk device of
TEENY, either the COM1 or the COM2 serial port harware must exist in your PC
and that hardware must be assigned to a connector (e.g., DB9) where you can
attach the null-modem cable. The COM port issue confuses many folks. Fear
not. You can use TEENY.EXE experimentally to determine which COM ports
exist. By itself (no attached null-modem cable, no Tandy laptop) TEENY.EXE
will determine which COM ports exist, by experiment. The results of four
experimental attempts with TEENY.EXE will clarify the COM port picture of
your PC. See the command line invocations of TEENY.EXE shown below.
TEENY /4
TEENY /3
TEENY /2
TEENY /1
For each, the PC screen instructs you to attach a null-modem cable and
invoke BASIC at the Tandy laptop and type something. Ignore all that --
this is an experiment. The PC screen also shows another instruction which
you do follow -- At PC, press any key to begin a boot load of TEENY into the
laptop. Do it -- press any key and see what happens next.
One of three things happens next. Watch the PC screen. #1 -- Where you
immediately get the message "COMn port hardware not equipped." you know with
certainty that particular COM port hardware (where n is a digit 4, 3, 2, or
1) does not exist in your PC. #2 -- Where you get no message at all
(unlikely) you know with certainty that particular COM port hardware does
exist but, unfortunately, it is assigned to some internal device (e.g., a
modem) rather than to a connector where you could attach the null-modem
cable. #3 -- Where you immediately get the message "Checking for presence
of a Tandy laptop." and shortly afterwards get the message "Can't detect
laptop." you know with certainty that particular COM port hardware does
exist and likely is assigned to a connector where you could attach the
null-modem cable.
You are interested in obtaining response #3. So if you get response #3 for
either the TEENY /2 or TEENY /1 command line invocations of TEENY.EXE then
use of DeskLink is viable. In other words, the COM1 port or COM2 port
exists (a DeskLink requirement). But if you get response #3 exclusively for
the TEENY /4 or TEENY /3 command line invocations of TEENY.EXE then you can
acquire TEENY.CO but it can't be used with DeskLink (must use TEENY.CO with
a Tandy Portable Disk Drive).
Do the experiment and resolve the issue about COM port(s) of your PC.
-= Ron =-
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 12:44 AM
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
...........It's the application (software) and the application (your
intent) that we need to know about.........
I will be using teeny.exe and Desklink.
My application or purpose that I will be using this Tandy 102 for is: I
can use it to do my writing in portable fashion, away from home, library,
woods, moon, where ever I may find myself.
Then, upload my writing from the Tandy 102 to my modern every day computer
in order to keep my second novel under construction.
----- Original Message -----
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 18:32:10 -0800
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by JUST ME
Does anyone know, or know someone who, that can comfirm that this
Tandy
102 setup will function with Windows XP?
Post by JUST ME
--
WinXP Service Pack 2. The Tandy? BASIC, as usual.
Greetings "Just Me",
I think the gang's being rather thorough with respect to your query re
the
necessary cabling to help make your experience work. You've asked if
anyone
can confirm it will work, no one knows - because there are any number of
strange things that can happen. Is it likely to work, yes. Will it work
the
first time, possibly. If not right away will it work eventually, likely.
You can help the list help you by identifying what software you will be
running on/under your WinXP and if you have any software identified for
use
on the Model T. It's the application (software) and the application
(your
intent) that we need to know about.
XP is an OS and BASIC is a programming language. I'm not a guru here
with
this box, by any stretch, nor with XP, just noting this apparently
missing
piece of info.
What do you expect or hope it will do? Arguably most folks are looking
to
transfer data from the Model T to the PC either as a file transfer or
having the PC mimic the portable disk drive - so storage. The other
chief
activity could be said to be transferring programs to the Model T from
the
PC that they have downloaded. Are these things you wish to do?
Cheers, JD
--
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Ron Wiesen
2003-12-17 23:41:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by JUST ME
Great, response #3. Better that it cant find laptop at this stage as
compared to
Post by JUST ME
cannot find COM#. So it has to be the 9 pin serial. Relief.
Excellent. For which COM port(s) did you get that response, COM2 or COM1?
In other words, did you get it for the command line invocation TEENY /2 or
for the command line invocation TEENY /1 (or for both)?
Post by JUST ME
After the sheer repetition of it appearing for a micro second, I made out
that
Post by JUST ME
it says, "Can't detect laptop." Then wham, the DOS window closes.
Not to worry. Apparently you are not using a command line for invocation.
You need to obtain what's called a "DOS prompt" under the Windows XP Op Sys.
I'm unfamiliar with such trivial detail in regard to the the Windows XP Op
Sys. But a Google search for "DOS prompt in Windows XP" found the following
link.

[ http://www.iup.edu/helpdesk/service/pc/software/winxp/winxpfaq.shtm#dos ]

Quoting this Frequently Asked Question link....
====================
How do I get to the MS-DOS prompt in Windows XP?
Post by JUST ME
From the Start menu, choose Run. In the dialog box that appears, type "CMD",
then click OK. The MS-DOS window will appear. Please note that the DOS
window defaults to your H: drive.
====================

There you have it. The so-called "MS-DOS window" (an oxymoron) should be a
stable window that will not close by itself. At this point you have command
line control of your PC -- ideal for DeskLink operation and for TEENY.EXE
operation. Likely you will have to type some DOS command, such as EXIT, to
close the MS-DOS window whenever you (not Windows XP) decide to end a
session of command line control and relinguish control back to Windows XP.

-= Ron =-
JUST ME
2003-12-17 23:59:51 UTC
Permalink
.................Excellent. For which COM port(s) did you get that response, COM2 or COM1?
In other words, did you get it for the command line invocation TEENY/2 or for the command line invocation TEENY /1 (or for both)?..........

This brand new expensive computer has no com ports. Noticed that on taking it out of the box. They are probably trying to get that out just like they are getting the floopy out.

I have one available 9 pin male serial port on this computer so since there are no com ports it stands to reason that teeny found the 9 pin serial and couldn't find the laptop so that notice is better than it not finding com.

Teeny1, teeny 2??? No command line just click on the teeny icon in C:root






----- Original Message -----
From: "Ron Wiesen" <ronw-***@public.gmane.org>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 18:41:42 -0500
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by JUST ME
Post by JUST ME
Great, response #3. Better that it cant find laptop at this stage as
compared to
Post by JUST ME
cannot find COM#. So it has to be the 9 pin serial. Relief.
Excellent. For which COM port(s) did you get that response, COM2 or COM1?
In other words, did you get it for the command line invocation TEENY /2 or
for the command line invocation TEENY /1 (or for both)?
Post by JUST ME
After the sheer repetition of it appearing for a micro second, I made out
that
Post by JUST ME
it says, "Can't detect laptop." Then wham, the DOS window closes.
Not to worry. Apparently you are not using a command line for invocation.
You need to obtain what's called a "DOS prompt" under the Windows XP Op Sys.
I'm unfamiliar with such trivial detail in regard to the the Windows XP Op
Sys. But a Google search for "DOS prompt in Windows XP" found the following
link.
[ http://www.iup.edu/helpdesk/service/pc/software/winxp/winxpfaq.shtm#dos ]
Quoting this Frequently Asked Question link....
====================
How do I get to the MS-DOS prompt in Windows XP?
From the Start menu, choose Run. In the dialog box that appears, type "CMD",
then click OK. The MS-DOS window will appear. Please note that the DOS
window defaults to your H: drive.
====================
There you have it. The so-called "MS-DOS window" (an oxymoron) should be a
stable window that will not close by itself. At this point you have command
line control of your PC -- ideal for DeskLink operation and for TEENY.EXE
operation. Likely you will have to type some DOS command, such as EXIT, to
close the MS-DOS window whenever you (not Windows XP) decide to end a
session of command line control and relinguish control back to Windows XP.
-= Ron =-
--
___________________________________________________________
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Bob Pigford
2003-12-18 00:15:52 UTC
Permalink
Is it possible that the 9 pin connector on your computer is not a serial
port? Could it be a connector for an external monitor? Could it be that
you will need to purchase a USB Serial Port adapter (plugs into the USB port
and has a serial port on the other end)? So many computers now-a-days have
abandoned "legacy" ports (serial and parallel specifically).
I know this a real basic question, and I apologise if it is too basic. I
just thought I would clear off this possibility.
Regards,
Bob
----- Original Message -----
From: "JUST ME" <heapbigchief-***@public.gmane.org>
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 6:59 PM
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by JUST ME
.................Excellent. For which COM port(s) did you get that response, COM2 or COM1?
In other words, did you get it for the command line invocation TEENY/2 or
for the command line invocation TEENY /1 (or for both)?..........
Post by JUST ME
This brand new expensive computer has no com ports. Noticed that on taking
it out of the box. They are probably trying to get that out just like they
are getting the floopy out.
Post by JUST ME
I have one available 9 pin male serial port on this computer so since
there are no com ports it stands to reason that teeny found the 9 pin serial
and couldn't find the laptop so that notice is better than it not finding
com.
Post by JUST ME
Teeny1, teeny 2??? No command line just click on the teeny icon in C:root
----- Original Message -----
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 18:41:42 -0500
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by JUST ME
Post by JUST ME
Great, response #3. Better that it cant find laptop at this stage as
compared to
Post by JUST ME
cannot find COM#. So it has to be the 9 pin serial. Relief.
Excellent. For which COM port(s) did you get that response, COM2 or COM1?
In other words, did you get it for the command line invocation TEENY /2 or
for the command line invocation TEENY /1 (or for both)?
Post by JUST ME
After the sheer repetition of it appearing for a micro second, I made out
that
Post by JUST ME
it says, "Can't detect laptop." Then wham, the DOS window closes.
Not to worry. Apparently you are not using a command line for invocation.
You need to obtain what's called a "DOS prompt" under the Windows XP Op Sys.
I'm unfamiliar with such trivial detail in regard to the the Windows XP Op
Sys. But a Google search for "DOS prompt in Windows XP" found the following
link.
[
http://www.iup.edu/helpdesk/service/pc/software/winxp/winxpfaq.shtm#dos ]
Post by JUST ME
Post by JUST ME
Quoting this Frequently Asked Question link....
====================
How do I get to the MS-DOS prompt in Windows XP?
From the Start menu, choose Run. In the dialog box that appears, type "CMD",
then click OK. The MS-DOS window will appear. Please note that the DOS
window defaults to your H: drive.
====================
There you have it. The so-called "MS-DOS window" (an oxymoron) should be a
stable window that will not close by itself. At this point you have command
line control of your PC -- ideal for DeskLink operation and for TEENY.EXE
operation. Likely you will have to type some DOS command, such as EXIT, to
close the MS-DOS window whenever you (not Windows XP) decide to end a
session of command line control and relinguish control back to Windows XP.
-= Ron =-
--
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Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com
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Ron Wiesen
2003-12-18 02:40:38 UTC
Permalink
I believe you are mistaken about the PC having no COM ports. TEENY.EXE
requested the Op Sys to OPEN a COM port, and the Op Sys did so. I believe
what you refer to as a "serial port" IS a COM port. I could be wrong --
TEENY.EXE may have OPENed a USB port, but I doubt that a fine MicroSoft
product like Windows XP would do such a thing. Also note what Bib Pigford
Post by Bob Pigford
Is it possible that the 9 pin connector on your computer is not a serial
port? Could it be a connector for an external monitor? Could it be that
you will need to purchase a USB Serial Port adapter (plugs into the USB
port
Post by Bob Pigford
and has a serial port on the other end)? So many computers now-a-days have
abandoned "legacy" ports (serial and parallel specifically).
I know this a real basic question, and I apologise if it is too basic. I
just thought I would clear off this possibility.
From "No command line just click on the teeny icon" I determine two things.
#1 -- The COM port TEENY.EXE used is the COM1 port. This I know to be true
because TEENY.EXE assumes COM1 port where you do not explicitly steer it
(and you didn't) with a / switch in the command line for invocation. In
other words, TEENY.EXE steered to its default COM port, which is the COM1
port. Thus, the COM1 port of your PC is available and useful for using
TEENY.EXE (a use once facility) and for using DESKLINK.COM (a use everyday
facility). BTW: DESKLINK.COM also steers by default to COM1 port, and it
also allows the /1 or /2 switch in the command line for invocation to
explicitly steer it.

#2 -- As yet, you are not using a command line for invocation. You're just
mouse clicking, letting defaults engage, and hoping that Windows XP reacts
in a fashion that is helpful. Go do the [Start] [Run] [type CMD in dialog
box] [OK] thing, just like the Frequently Asked Question explained. I'm
sure there are several ways to obtain a "DOS prompt" under the Windows XP Op
Sys, but for now use the one the Frequently Asked Question explained. Later
you can find a more direct and less burdensome way to obtain command line
control of your PC.

Once you have command line control of your PC, try the following two command
line invocations.

TEENY /? (or perhaps the more explict H:\ROOT\TEENY /? command is
needed)

DESKLINK /? (or perhaps the more explict H:\ROOT\DESKLINK /? command is
needed)

Each of these command line invocations present a screenful of syntax
explanations. Various / switches are described, arguments are described,
etc. The screens presented by these command line invocations also are shown
in the TEENY.EXE manual under heading "TEENY.EXE Placement and Syntax" and
heading "About DeskLink".

-= Ron =-

----- Original Message -----
From: "JUST ME" <heapbigchief-***@public.gmane.org>
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 6:59 PM
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Bob Pigford
.................Excellent. For which COM port(s) did you get that response, COM2 or COM1?
In other words, did you get it for the command line invocation TEENY/2 or
for the command line invocation TEENY /1 (or for both)?..........
Post by Bob Pigford
This brand new expensive computer has no com ports. Noticed that on taking
it out of the box. They are probably trying to get that out just like they
are getting the floopy out.
Post by Bob Pigford
I have one available 9 pin male serial port on this computer so since
there are no com ports it stands to reason that teeny found the 9 pin serial
and couldn't find the laptop so that notice is better than it not finding
com.
Post by Bob Pigford
Teeny1, teeny 2??? No command line just click on the teeny icon in C:root
----- Original Message -----
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 18:41:42 -0500
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by JUST ME
Post by JUST ME
Great, response #3. Better that it cant find laptop at this stage as
compared to
Post by JUST ME
cannot find COM#. So it has to be the 9 pin serial. Relief.
Excellent. For which COM port(s) did you get that response, COM2 or COM1?
In other words, did you get it for the command line invocation TEENY /2 or
for the command line invocation TEENY /1 (or for both)?
Post by JUST ME
After the sheer repetition of it appearing for a micro second, I made out
that
Post by JUST ME
it says, "Can't detect laptop." Then wham, the DOS window closes.
Not to worry. Apparently you are not using a command line for invocation.
You need to obtain what's called a "DOS prompt" under the Windows XP Op Sys.
I'm unfamiliar with such trivial detail in regard to the the Windows XP Op
Sys. But a Google search for "DOS prompt in Windows XP" found the following
link.
[
http://www.iup.edu/helpdesk/service/pc/software/winxp/winxpfaq.shtm#dos ]
Post by Bob Pigford
Post by JUST ME
Quoting this Frequently Asked Question link....
====================
How do I get to the MS-DOS prompt in Windows XP?
From the Start menu, choose Run. In the dialog box that appears, type "CMD",
then click OK. The MS-DOS window will appear. Please note that the DOS
window defaults to your H: drive.
====================
There you have it. The so-called "MS-DOS window" (an oxymoron) should be a
stable window that will not close by itself. At this point you have command
line control of your PC -- ideal for DeskLink operation and for TEENY.EXE
operation. Likely you will have to type some DOS command, such as EXIT, to
close the MS-DOS window whenever you (not Windows XP) decide to end a
session of command line control and relinguish control back to Windows XP.
-= Ron =-
Jan Vanden Bossche
2003-12-18 08:42:44 UTC
Permalink
Hallo

----- Original Message -----
Post by JUST ME
Post by Ron Wiesen
In other words, did you get it for the command line invocation
TEENY/2 or for the command line invocation TEENY /1 ?
This brand new expensive computer has no com ports.
What do you think a com port looks like ?
Post by JUST ME
I have one available 9 pin male serial port
Let's be blunt:

**** 9 pin male serial port EQUALS a com port **** (probably COM1)
Post by JUST ME
Teeny1, teeny 2??? No command line just click on the teeny icon in C:root
Click right on the TEENY icon
Create shortcut
Click right on shortcut
Properties
You find the TARGET line, where it probably says 'C:\TEENY.EXE'
Add /1

Repeat the same for /2

Or use the command-line trick I mentioned before.

Greetings from the TyRannoSaurus
Jan-80
comet-dQOVMCoZ74uN/ (Comet (650)839-1410)
2003-12-18 00:30:51 UTC
Permalink
You may wish to use James Kinney's TANDY100.ICO as your icon. To do this,
create a shortcut to your hyperterminal setup file for your COM port, and
shortcut property to point to your copy of the icon file.

right-mouse to change your short cu

Message-ID: <20031217045942.62965.qmail-***@public.gmane.org>
From: "JUST ME" <heapbigchief-***@public.gmane.org>
To: m100-***@public.gmane.org
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 23:59:42 -0500
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
X-Originating-Ip: 216.12.106.74
X-Originating-Server: ws1-9.us4.outblaze.com


Yep. Got that.

HyperTerminalHyperTerminal is a program that you can use to connect to other computers, Telnet sites, bulletin board systems (BBSs), online services, and host computers, using either your modem or a null modem cable:

For help with specific tasks, see How to.
For general background information, see Concepts.
For problem-solving instructions, see Troubleshooting.

Plus I have: HYPERTRM.EXE-005E8A53.pf that is listed as opening with an "unknown application".

What do I put into the area that wants: "Enter a name and choose an icon for the connection."




----- Original Message -----
From: "Neil Morrison" <neilsmorr-***@public.gmane.org>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 20:29:43 -0800
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Neil Morrison
Software.
C:\Program Files\Accessories\HyperTerminal\Hypertrm.exe
NM
----- Original Message -----
Post by JUST ME
A hyper terminal. Is that a 9 pin serial port?
I have a 102. I don't want to put files on the 102. I wish to take
my 102 out of the house to write on then move the file to the XP when
I get home.
--
___________________________________________________________
Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com
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JUST ME
2003-12-18 02:48:15 UTC
Permalink
I refer to it as a serial port because Compaq has that sticker/label on it on the back.

My system is:

Specifications
Processor
•
Intel ®
Pentium ®
4 processor 2.5GHz 2.5GHz(a)
(Cache Memory
•
L2 Cache = 512KB
Memory
•
512MB PC2100 DDR SDRAM memory (expandable
(expandable to 1GB) 1GB)(b)
(Hard Drive
•
120GB Ultra DMA hard drive drive(c)
(Floppy Disk Drive
•
3.5" 1.44MB Floppy Disk Drive
Multimedia Drive
•
DVD-ROM drive drive(d)
(16x max. speed with Intervideo
IntervideoTM
TM Win DVD software
CD-rewritable drive
•
CD-RW (48x24x48x) 48x max. write speed, 24x
24x max. re-write speed, 48x max. read speed
speed(d)
(Video Graphics
•
Integrated Intel ®
Extreme Graphics with up to
to 64MB shared video memory
Network Interface
•
Integrated 10/100Base-T networking interface
interface
Sound
•
Integrated AC-97
Fax/Modem
•
High-speed V.92 ready data/fax modem modem(e)
(Total Memory Slots
•
Two 184-pin (one available)
Expansion Slots
•
Three PCI (two available)
Expansion Bays
•
Two 5.25: bays (none available)
•
Three internal 3.5" (one available)
I/O Connectors
•
Six Hi-Speed USB 2.0 (two front, four rear)
•
One Serial...........the 9 pin I have been referring to..............
•
One Parallel..........this is a lie because the other two are the monitor and printer................
•
Two PS/2
•
One External VGA monitor
Included Peripherals
•
Presario Internet keyboard
•
PS/2 Scroller mouse
Dimensions
•
Packaged: 11.38" x 20.125" x 22.5"
•
Un-Packaged: 14.6" x 6.9" x 16.6"
Weight
•
Packaged: 35 lbs
Power Requirements
•
100-127V - 4.0A (50/60Hz

----- Original Message -----
From: "Bob Pigford" <rpigford3-***@public.gmane.org>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 19:15:52 -0500
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Bob Pigford
Is it possible that the 9 pin connector on your computer is not a serial
port? Could it be a connector for an external monitor? Could it be that
you will need to purchase a USB Serial Port adapter (plugs into the USB port
and has a serial port on the other end)? So many computers now-a-days have
abandoned "legacy" ports (serial and parallel specifically).
I know this a real basic question, and I apologise if it is too basic. I
just thought I would clear off this possibility.
Regards,
Bob
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 6:59 PM
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by JUST ME
.................Excellent. For which COM port(s) did you get that
response, COM2 or COM1?
Post by JUST ME
In other words, did you get it for the command line invocation TEENY/2 or
for the command line invocation TEENY /1 (or for both)?..........
Post by JUST ME
This brand new expensive computer has no com ports. Noticed that on taking
it out of the box. They are probably trying to get that out just like they
are getting the floopy out.
Post by JUST ME
I have one available 9 pin male serial port on this computer so since
there are no com ports it stands to reason that teeny found the 9 pin serial
and couldn't find the laptop so that notice is better than it not finding
com.
Post by JUST ME
Teeny1, teeny 2??? No command line just click on the teeny icon in C:root
----- Original Message -----
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 18:41:42 -0500
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by JUST ME
Post by JUST ME
Great, response #3. Better that it cant find laptop at this stage as
compared to
Post by JUST ME
cannot find COM#. So it has to be the 9 pin serial. Relief.
Excellent. For which COM port(s) did you get that response, COM2 or
COM1?
Post by JUST ME
Post by JUST ME
In other words, did you get it for the command line invocation TEENY /2
or
Post by JUST ME
Post by JUST ME
for the command line invocation TEENY /1 (or for both)?
Post by JUST ME
After the sheer repetition of it appearing for a micro second, I made
out
Post by JUST ME
Post by JUST ME
that
Post by JUST ME
it says, "Can't detect laptop." Then wham, the DOS window closes.
Not to worry. Apparently you are not using a command line for
invocation.
Post by JUST ME
Post by JUST ME
You need to obtain what's called a "DOS prompt" under the Windows XP Op
Sys.
Post by JUST ME
Post by JUST ME
I'm unfamiliar with such trivial detail in regard to the the Windows XP
Op
Post by JUST ME
Post by JUST ME
Sys. But a Google search for "DOS prompt in Windows XP" found the
following
Post by JUST ME
Post by JUST ME
link.
[
http://www.iup.edu/helpdesk/service/pc/software/winxp/winxpfaq.shtm#dos ]
Post by JUST ME
Post by JUST ME
Quoting this Frequently Asked Question link....
====================
How do I get to the MS-DOS prompt in Windows XP?
From the Start menu, choose Run. In the dialog box that appears, type
"CMD",
Post by JUST ME
Post by JUST ME
then click OK. The MS-DOS window will appear. Please note that the DOS
window defaults to your H: drive.
====================
There you have it. The so-called "MS-DOS window" (an oxymoron) should
be a
Post by JUST ME
Post by JUST ME
stable window that will not close by itself. At this point you have
command
Post by JUST ME
Post by JUST ME
line control of your PC -- ideal for DeskLink operation and for
TEENY.EXE
Post by JUST ME
Post by JUST ME
operation. Likely you will have to type some DOS command, such as EXIT,
to
Post by JUST ME
Post by JUST ME
close the MS-DOS window whenever you (not Windows XP) decide to end a
session of command line control and relinguish control back to Windows
XP.
Post by JUST ME
Post by JUST ME
-= Ron =-
--
___________________________________________________________
Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com
http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm
--
___________________________________________________________
Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com
http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm
Neil Morrison
2003-12-18 02:50:30 UTC
Permalink
In Messy-Dos world, the serial ports are called COM1: to COM4:
depending on number. The parallel ports are PRN: or LPT1: to LPT3:
and the console is CON: (both the keyboard and the display). E & OE.

A 9 pin port is a serial (Com) port. The other 9 pin was the CGA
connector but it was the opposite gender. You won't find one of those
these days.

Neil

----- Original Message -----
Post by JUST ME
I refer to it as a serial port because Compaq has that
sticker/label on it on the back.
Post by JUST ME
...
JUST ME
2003-12-18 02:51:13 UTC
Permalink
I call it a serial port since that is the way Compaq has it labeled on the back of the computer.
Specifications
Processor
•
Intel ®
Pentium ®
4 processor 2.5GHz 2.5GHz(a)
(Cache Memory
•
L2 Cache = 512KB
Memory
•
512MB PC2100 DDR SDRAM memory (expandable
(expandable to 1GB) 1GB)(b)
(Hard Drive
•
120GB Ultra DMA hard drive drive(c)
(Floppy Disk Drive
•
3.5" 1.44MB Floppy Disk Drive
Multimedia Drive
•
DVD-ROM drive drive(d)
(16x max. speed with Intervideo
IntervideoTM
TM Win DVD software
CD-rewritable drive
•
CD-RW (48x24x48x) 48x max. write speed, 24x
24x max. re-write speed, 48x max. read speed
speed(d)
(Video Graphics
•
Integrated Intel ®
Extreme Graphics with up to
to 64MB shared video memory
Network Interface
•
Integrated 10/100Base-T networking interface
interface
Sound
•
Integrated AC-97
Fax/Modem
•
High-speed V.92 ready data/fax modem modem(e)
(Total Memory Slots
•
Two 184-pin (one available)
Expansion Slots
•
Three PCI (two available)
Expansion Bays
•
Two 5.25: bays (none available)
•
Three internal 3.5" (one available)
I/O Connectors
•
Six Hi-Speed USB 2.0 (two front, four rear)
•
One Serial...........the 9 pin I have been referring to..............
•
One Parallel..........this is a lie because the other two are the monitor and printer................
•
Two PS/2
•
One External VGA monitor
Included Peripherals
•
Presario Internet keyboard
•
PS/2 Scroller mouse
Dimensions
•
Packaged: 11.38" x 20.125" x 22.5"
•
Un-Packaged: 14.6" x 6.9" x 16.6"
Weight
•
Packaged: 35 lbs
Power Requirements
•
100-127V - 4.0A (50/60Hz


----- Original Message -----
From: "Ron Wiesen" <ronw-***@public.gmane.org>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 21:40:38 -0500
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Ron Wiesen
I believe you are mistaken about the PC having no COM ports. TEENY.EXE
requested the Op Sys to OPEN a COM port, and the Op Sys did so. I believe
what you refer to as a "serial port" IS a COM port. I could be wrong --
TEENY.EXE may have OPENed a USB port, but I doubt that a fine MicroSoft
product like Windows XP would do such a thing. Also note what Bib Pigford
Post by Bob Pigford
Is it possible that the 9 pin connector on your computer is not a serial
port? Could it be a connector for an external monitor? Could it be that
you will need to purchase a USB Serial Port adapter (plugs into the USB
port
Post by Bob Pigford
and has a serial port on the other end)? So many computers now-a-days have
abandoned "legacy" ports (serial and parallel specifically).
I know this a real basic question, and I apologise if it is too basic. I
just thought I would clear off this possibility.
From "No command line just click on the teeny icon" I determine two things.
#1 -- The COM port TEENY.EXE used is the COM1 port. This I know to be true
because TEENY.EXE assumes COM1 port where you do not explicitly steer it
(and you didn't) with a / switch in the command line for invocation. In
other words, TEENY.EXE steered to its default COM port, which is the COM1
port. Thus, the COM1 port of your PC is available and useful for using
TEENY.EXE (a use once facility) and for using DESKLINK.COM (a use everyday
facility). BTW: DESKLINK.COM also steers by default to COM1 port, and it
also allows the /1 or /2 switch in the command line for invocation to
explicitly steer it.
#2 -- As yet, you are not using a command line for invocation. You're just
mouse clicking, letting defaults engage, and hoping that Windows XP reacts
in a fashion that is helpful. Go do the [Start] [Run] [type CMD in dialog
box] [OK] thing, just like the Frequently Asked Question explained. I'm
sure there are several ways to obtain a "DOS prompt" under the Windows XP Op
Sys, but for now use the one the Frequently Asked Question explained. Later
you can find a more direct and less burdensome way to obtain command line
control of your PC.
Once you have command line control of your PC, try the following two command
line invocations.
TEENY /? (or perhaps the more explict H:\ROOT\TEENY /? command is
needed)
DESKLINK /? (or perhaps the more explict H:\ROOT\DESKLINK /? command is
needed)
Each of these command line invocations present a screenful of syntax
explanations. Various / switches are described, arguments are described,
etc. The screens presented by these command line invocations also are shown
in the TEENY.EXE manual under heading "TEENY.EXE Placement and Syntax" and
heading "About DeskLink".
-= Ron =-
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 6:59 PM
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Bob Pigford
.................Excellent. For which COM port(s) did you get that
response, COM2 or COM1?
Post by Bob Pigford
In other words, did you get it for the command line invocation TEENY/2 or
for the command line invocation TEENY /1 (or for both)?..........
Post by Bob Pigford
This brand new expensive computer has no com ports. Noticed that on taking
it out of the box. They are probably trying to get that out just like they
are getting the floopy out.
Post by Bob Pigford
I have one available 9 pin male serial port on this computer so since
there are no com ports it stands to reason that teeny found the 9 pin serial
and couldn't find the laptop so that notice is better than it not finding
com.
Post by Bob Pigford
Teeny1, teeny 2??? No command line just click on the teeny icon in C:root
----- Original Message -----
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 18:41:42 -0500
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by JUST ME
Post by JUST ME
Great, response #3. Better that it cant find laptop at this stage as
compared to
Post by JUST ME
cannot find COM#. So it has to be the 9 pin serial. Relief.
Excellent. For which COM port(s) did you get that response, COM2 or
COM1?
Post by Bob Pigford
Post by JUST ME
In other words, did you get it for the command line invocation TEENY /2
or
Post by Bob Pigford
Post by JUST ME
for the command line invocation TEENY /1 (or for both)?
Post by JUST ME
After the sheer repetition of it appearing for a micro second, I made
out
Post by Bob Pigford
Post by JUST ME
that
Post by JUST ME
it says, "Can't detect laptop." Then wham, the DOS window closes.
Not to worry. Apparently you are not using a command line for
invocation.
Post by Bob Pigford
Post by JUST ME
You need to obtain what's called a "DOS prompt" under the Windows XP Op
Sys.
Post by Bob Pigford
Post by JUST ME
I'm unfamiliar with such trivial detail in regard to the the Windows XP
Op
Post by Bob Pigford
Post by JUST ME
Sys. But a Google search for "DOS prompt in Windows XP" found the
following
Post by Bob Pigford
Post by JUST ME
link.
[
http://www.iup.edu/helpdesk/service/pc/software/winxp/winxpfaq.shtm#dos ]
Post by Bob Pigford
Post by JUST ME
Quoting this Frequently Asked Question link....
====================
How do I get to the MS-DOS prompt in Windows XP?
From the Start menu, choose Run. In the dialog box that appears, type
"CMD",
Post by Bob Pigford
Post by JUST ME
then click OK. The MS-DOS window will appear. Please note that the DOS
window defaults to your H: drive.
====================
There you have it. The so-called "MS-DOS window" (an oxymoron) should
be a
Post by Bob Pigford
Post by JUST ME
stable window that will not close by itself. At this point you have
command
Post by Bob Pigford
Post by JUST ME
line control of your PC -- ideal for DeskLink operation and for
TEENY.EXE
Post by Bob Pigford
Post by JUST ME
operation. Likely you will have to type some DOS command, such as EXIT,
to
Post by Bob Pigford
Post by JUST ME
close the MS-DOS window whenever you (not Windows XP) decide to end a
session of command line control and relinguish control back to Windows
XP.
Post by Bob Pigford
Post by JUST ME
-= Ron =-
--
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Ron Wiesen
2003-12-18 03:12:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by JUST ME
I call it a serial port since that is the way Compaq has it labeled
on the back of the computer.
Fine. The Op Sys uses the reserved name COM1 for it. You're in business!
Post by JUST ME
Specifications
.
One Serial...........the 9 pin I have been referring to..............
It's the connector appearance of the COM1 port; you're in business!
Post by JUST ME
Specifications
.
Power Requirements
.
100-127V - 4.0A (50/60Hz
Wow! 480 Watts power consumption, and nearly all of it dissipated as heat.
Running this beast for 2 hours means the electric company will charge you
for nearly 1 Kilo Watt Hour. And running the house air conditioner to pump
the dissipated heat to the outside means the electric company will charge
you for considerably more than 1 Kilo Watt Hour.

-= Ron =-
JUST ME
2003-12-18 02:57:10 UTC
Permalink
DOS will never die as long as Windows exists. No microsoft computer can run without it. DOS is hidden in High Memory=HIMEM.sys I think it is but could be wrong, then Windows sits on top of DOS and when you click here there or anywhere, Windows enters the DOS command line. Windows basicaly is just a convenient and flashy covering for DOS.


----- Original Message -----
From: "Ron Wiesen" <ronw-***@public.gmane.org>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 19:20:10 -0500
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Subject: Under the hood -- Was: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Ron Wiesen
Oh my God! You are indirectly revealing Bill Gates' long kept secret. The
(no longer) secret is: deep down under the hood of every flavor of Windoze,
where the rubber meets the road, you find (wait for it folks)..... QDOS
(Quick & Dirty Operating System).
A very long time ago Bill Gates purchased QDOS. He needed "some operating
system" so he could sell his BASIC interpreter to IBM. IBM was under the
illusion that Bill Gates had developed both a BASIC interpreter and an
operating system to support it. Bill hit up his dad for some bucks and went
a few blocks to see his friend (who shall ever remain nameless) about
purchasing all rights to QDOS. Bucks were paid and Bill Gates became the
owner (never the developer) of QDOS. This cinched his deal with IBM. First
came a cosmetic name change -- QDOS became MS-DOS (MicroSoft Disk Operating
System). Then followed minor tinkering: DOS 2.0, DOS 3.0, and so on.
Around DOS 3.2 or thereabouts the tinkering caused more dysfunction than
function such that later versions of MS-DOS started to p... me off. Around
DOS 6.0 it got real dysfunctional -- I got fully p...ed off.
Meanwhile back at MicroSoft, a few top folks with court order in hand paid a
visit to MacIntosh headquarters. They peeked at all of the MacIntosh stuff
under development. They were surprised to find an honest-to-goodness
operating system that was graphical. Returning to MicroSoft headquarters
they immediately began developing a graphical shell environment to sit atop
DOS. They called it Windows. They still call it Windows. It still is not
an operating system. Under the hood you still find an operating system --
QDOS.
The rest of the story now is history.
-= Ron =-
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 5:08 PM
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Ron Hudson
Post by Ron Wiesen
Good. Now we know your plan. The null-modem drawings (Preferred or
Typical) will meet the requirements of DeskLink at the PC COM port and
TEENY.CO at the Model 102 RS-232C port. So the null-modem cable issue
has
been put to rest.
Your PC operating system (Op Sys) is Windows XP. Fine. That's not an
issue. The TEENY and DeskLink combination haas been used by folks with
sundry flavors of Windows Op Sys (Win95, Win98, WinNT, Win2000, and so
on ad
nauseam). So the Op Sys of your PC is not an issue.
Can your desktop boot from a floppy? If you setup a floppy with DOS 6.x
and
reboot your desktop with it... do you have regular serial ports?
As long as you have regular serial ports and a bootable A: drive you
can setup
a Floppy with Desklink on it. I have done this (although the floppy is
MIA at
the moment [:^( ] ).
--
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Jan Vanden Bossche
2003-12-18 08:53:43 UTC
Permalink
Sorry guys:

There is no DOS under Windows NT, 2K or XP any more. There was a DOS under
95, 98 and ME.

What you see when you start CMD is actually the 32-bit command line
interpreter. It's not DOS as such. It has virtually all the functionality of
DOS, but it's not.

The closest you get to DOS is when you type COMMAND. There you get a
DOS-emultor. Under Windows NT this was modeled after DOS 5, even so close as
to include QBASIC 1.0 and the two programs that were originally on the DOS
5.0 disks. (remember, that banana-throwing gorilla ?) But the DOS you see
doesn't drive the machine anymore. In Windows NT, there was a DOS-session
starting the installation procedure (best proof: an unpatched Windows NT
could only format its first partition to 2GB) but from Windows 2000 on, that
too is history.

I'm just as enthousiast at bashing M$ for its faults, but let's not offend
the truth...

BTW: how can you tell the difference between CMD and COMMAND
1. from the starting message is different.
2. type SET: the environment variables are sligtly different.

----- Original Message -----
Post by JUST ME
DOS will never die as long as Windows exists. No microsoft
computer can run without it. DOS is hidden in High Memory=HIMEM.sys
----- Original Message -----
Post by Ron Wiesen
Oh my God! You are indirectly revealing Bill Gates' long kept secret.
The
Post by JUST ME
Post by Ron Wiesen
(no longer) secret is: deep down under the hood of every flavor of Windoze,
where the rubber meets the road, you find (wait for it folks)..... QDOS
(Quick & Dirty Operating System).
Greetings from the TyRannoSaurus
Jan-80
JUST ME
2003-12-18 03:10:33 UTC
Permalink
............The other 9 pin was the CGA connector but it was the opposite gender. You won't find one of those these days.......

I don't know about your locaity but the Goodwill store here is a great source of old computers on a regular basis. There are two of them there now with that.



----- Original Message -----
From: "Neil Morrison" <neilsmorr-***@public.gmane.org>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 18:50:30 -0800
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Neil Morrison
and the console is CON: (both the keyboard and the display). E & OE.
A 9 pin port is a serial (Com) port. The other 9 pin was the CGA
connector but it was the opposite gender. You won't find one of those
these days.
Neil
----- Original Message -----
Post by JUST ME
I refer to it as a serial port because Compaq has that
sticker/label on it on the back.
Post by JUST ME
...
--
___________________________________________________________
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JUST ME
2003-12-18 03:19:16 UTC
Permalink
Great. I ordered the cable from Club 100 so I guess I just need to wait on the mail. With this being big time mail month with christmas packages and stuff there is no telling when it will arrive. In this locality they even deliver mail on Christmas day, so much mail in stock they have.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ron Wiesen" <ronw-***@public.gmane.org>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 22:12:43 -0500
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Ron Wiesen
Post by JUST ME
I call it a serial port since that is the way Compaq has it labeled
on the back of the computer.
Fine. The Op Sys uses the reserved name COM1 for it. You're in business!
Post by JUST ME
Specifications
.
One Serial...........the 9 pin I have been referring to..............
It's the connector appearance of the COM1 port; you're in business!
Post by JUST ME
Specifications
.
Power Requirements
.
100-127V - 4.0A (50/60Hz
Wow! 480 Watts power consumption, and nearly all of it dissipated as heat.
Running this beast for 2 hours means the electric company will charge you
for nearly 1 Kilo Watt Hour. And running the house air conditioner to pump
the dissipated heat to the outside means the electric company will charge
you for considerably more than 1 Kilo Watt Hour.
-= Ron =-
--
___________________________________________________________
Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com
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Ron Wiesen
2003-12-18 03:45:41 UTC
Permalink
While you're awaiting arrival of the cable, RTFM.

TEENYDOC.TXT contains four manuals: TEENY, TEENY.EXE, TEENY.BA, and
TEENY.CO. So fire up your printer, follow the 2-step procedure of "DOCS FOR
TEENY" at the [ http://www.club100.org/library/doc/teenyldr.html ] link to
get hardcopy, and then RTFM. That way you'll be ready to rock 'n roll when
the cable arrives.

-= Ron =-

----- Original Message -----
From: "JUST ME" <heapbigchief-***@public.gmane.org>
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 10:19 PM
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by JUST ME
Great. I ordered the cable from Club 100 so I guess I just need to wait on
the mail. With this being big time mail month with christmas packages and
stuff there is no telling when it will arrive. In this locality they even
deliver mail on Christmas day, so much mail in stock they have.
JUST ME
2003-12-18 09:02:18 UTC
Permalink
Finally met someone who uses a KPro. Who would have thought.


----- Original Message -----
From: "Jan Vanden Bossche" <jan80-***@public.gmane.org>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 09:31:29 +0100
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Richard Larson
Hallo
----- Original Message -----
Sent: 17 December 2003 23:02
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Neil Morrison
Does that work on XP? I know it does on 98/ME
I've done it on WinNT4. No reason why it shouldn't work on XP. Can't test it
though, cause my own machine is Win2KPro, and my serial ports are tied up.
Just try it. Should work, AFAIK.
Post by Neil Morrison
NM
----- Original Message -----
Post by Jan Vanden Bossche
Try START, RUN... and type CMD. That will open a DOS-box (actually,
a command-window) and you can type commands in there without the
window disappearing. Change to the correct drive (A: or C:) and
change to the directory that contains TEENY.EXE.
Greetings from the TyRannoSaurus
Jan-80
--
___________________________________________________________
Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com
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Jan Vanden Bossche
2003-12-18 09:16:39 UTC
Permalink
Hallo

----- Original Message -----
Post by JUST ME
Finally met someone who uses a KPro. Who would have thought.
What is a KPro ? And why do you think I'm using it (or one) ?
Post by JUST ME
----- Original Message -----
Post by Jan Vanden Bossche
I've done it on WinNT4. No reason why it shouldn't work on XP. Can't test it
though, cause my own machine is Win2KPro, and my serial ports are tied up.
Greetings from the TyRannoSaurus
Jan-80
wenrin
2003-12-18 15:01:40 UTC
Permalink
<x-flowed>
Ok, a computer without a parallel port? Anyway, on PC's/PC Compatibles
the sort of "standard" serial/com port since the IBM AT has been a 9-pin
connector. Also COM/serial ports on PC computers have pins vs. sockets
for both the 25 pin and 9 pin serial port connectors. Usually all the
non-COM port "D" connectors on the PC have sockets vs pins. (Non "PC"
computers like the 100 may use a "socket" type connectors for the
COM/Serial port.)

I guess the distinction between COM and serial port is that the Serial
port is a physical device, with defined pin connections/functions. A COM
port is an "internal" computer
connection to a communcations device defined by an internal device
address, interrupt setting, and data rate setting. A COM port can be
assigned to a serial port, or an
internal modem or other device through which the computer communicates.


Have you checked the computer BIOS settings? Is the serial port
activated? Also what COM port setting is your modem using?
(I only have experience with older Pentium Compaqs which seemed to
either need something "broken" like disconnecting a hard drive, or
having to run a utility program to get see and set the BIOS settings.)
You need to check how the computer is set up and see if the serial port
is actually turned on. You should be able to tell how the modem is set
up from at the modem settings. You should also check out (I only have
Win2K here, not XP) the Device Manager (in Win2K it is in Administrative
Tools/Computer Management/System Tools/Device Manager. There you can see
what comm ports the system thinks you have running. (NT/Win2K/XP all use
a device manager software layer between applications and the hardware.
In DOS and Windows 3.x/Win 9x/ME software can access things like the
serial port directly. With a device manager, software can only access
hardware via the device manager. So even if you have a Com port, and it
is activated by the computers BIOS settings,
the software will not see it unless the device manager recognizes the
port is there, and allows the software programs access to it. (In NT the
device mangager is in the HAL (Hardware Abstraction Layer)portion of the
operating system.

-----Original Message-----
From: JUST ME [mailto:heapbigchief-***@public.gmane.org]
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 9:51 PM
To: m100-***@public.gmane.org
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP



I call it a serial port since that is the way Compaq has it labeled on
the back of the computer.
Specifications
Processor

I


</x-flowed>
David
2003-12-18 19:06:44 UTC
Permalink
Hello everybody! I have a question in need of a good
answer. My mom has a e-machine that uses Windows XP
and it has a headphone jack as well as a microphone
jack. Since I use my Model 100 a lot I'm wondering if
it's possible to hook up the 100 to the XP computer
via the cassette cable so that I could load and/or
save files? I have the Desklink application burned to
CD if I want to install it on the XP computer but I
currently use it on my Tandy 1400HD to store my Model
100 files. I'd like to know if I could use the
cassette cable with the XP computer thus turning it
into a virtual recorder/player. Anyone out there who
could help with this idea?
Plus my Booster Pac is giving me problems again and I
think the battery is dying out.

David



__________________________________
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New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing.
http://photos.yahoo.com/
E. Edwards
2003-12-18 22:22:37 UTC
Permalink
this should work. essentially you are just using the jacks to "record audio"
form your model 100 (yes, it's actually a file on the m100 but to the xp
computer it's just audio). your files will just be saved as .wav files. play
them back to download. the only problem i see is getting the audio levels
set correctly.
----- Original Message -----
From: "David" <d3pl-/***@public.gmane.org>
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Sent: Thursday, December 18, 2003 9:06 AM
Subject: Model 100, Cassette cable and Windows XP
Post by David
Hello everybody! I have a question in need of a good
answer. My mom has a e-machine that uses Windows XP
and it has a headphone jack as well as a microphone
jack. Since I use my Model 100 a lot I'm wondering if
it's possible to hook up the 100 to the XP computer
via the cassette cable so that I could load and/or
save files? I have the Desklink application burned to
CD if I want to install it on the XP computer but I
currently use it on my Tandy 1400HD to store my Model
100 files. I'd like to know if I could use the
cassette cable with the XP computer thus turning it
into a virtual recorder/player. Anyone out there who
could help with this idea?
Plus my Booster Pac is giving me problems again and I
think the battery is dying out.
David
__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing.
http://photos.yahoo.com/
Neil Morrison
2003-12-18 22:24:40 UTC
Permalink
It's tedious, but can be done for the MC-10 and the Pocket Computers.

Neil

----- Original Message -----
Post by E. Edwards
this should work. essentially you are just using the jacks to
"record audio"
Post by E. Edwards
form your model 100 (yes, it's actually a file on the m100 but to the xp
computer it's just audio). your files will just be saved as .wav files. play
them back to download. the only problem i see is getting the audio levels
set correctly.
David
2003-12-19 00:01:59 UTC
Permalink
I have a Model 100, Tandy 1400HD, and a Sharp PC-1600
pocket computer. I don't have the cable for the
pocket yet but plan on getting one.

David
Post by Neil Morrison
It's tedious, but can be done for the MC-10 and the
Pocket Computers.
Neil
----- Original Message -----
Post by E. Edwards
this should work. essentially you are just using
the jacks to
"record audio"
Post by E. Edwards
form your model 100 (yes, it's actually a file on
the m100 but to
the xp
Post by E. Edwards
computer it's just audio). your files will just be
saved as .wav
files. play
Post by E. Edwards
them back to download. the only problem i see is
getting the audio
levels
Post by E. Edwards
set correctly.
__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing.
http://photos.yahoo.com/
Neil Morrison
2003-12-19 00:20:23 UTC
Permalink
You do need the cassette interface for the pocket you have.

Regards,

Neil

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PocketComp/

----- Original Message -----
Post by David
I have a Model 100, Tandy 1400HD, and a Sharp PC-1600
pocket computer. I don't have the cable for the
pocket yet but plan on getting one.
David
2003-12-19 04:48:51 UTC
Permalink
I have a question. Does anyone have a copy of
Tandycode for the barcode wand? I need it as the
barcode program on Club100.org won't work for some
reason. I have an Epson RX-80 dot matrix printer as
well as an Epson LQ1070. Help?

David



__________________________________
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New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing.
http://photos.yahoo.com/
Lee
2003-12-19 14:27:18 UTC
Permalink
Which computer are you using?
I have several copies of Bar code software for the model 200.

Lee
----- Original Message -----
From: "David" <d3pl-/***@public.gmane.org>
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Sent: Thursday, December 18, 2003 10:48 PM
Subject: Barcodes and wand.
Post by David
I have a question. Does anyone have a copy of
Tandycode for the barcode wand? I need it as the
barcode program on Club100.org won't work for some
reason. I have an Epson RX-80 dot matrix printer as
well as an Epson LQ1070. Help?
David
__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing.
http://photos.yahoo.com/
David
2003-12-18 23:48:24 UTC
Permalink
So if I download stuff from Club100.org would I be
able to load files into the 100 from the XP? I'd like
to try using the cassette cable because I'm not sure
if my null modem cable will work on the XP machine. I
hate XP by the way.

David
Post by E. Edwards
this should work. essentially you are just using the
jacks to "record audio"
form your model 100 (yes, it's actually a file on
the m100 but to the xp
computer it's just audio). your files will just be
saved as .wav files. play
them back to download. the only problem i see is
getting the audio levels
set correctly.
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, December 18, 2003 9:06 AM
Subject: Model 100, Cassette cable and Windows XP
Post by David
Hello everybody! I have a question in need of a
good
Post by David
answer. My mom has a e-machine that uses Windows
XP
Post by David
and it has a headphone jack as well as a
microphone
Post by David
jack. Since I use my Model 100 a lot I'm
wondering if
Post by David
it's possible to hook up the 100 to the XP
computer
Post by David
via the cassette cable so that I could load and/or
save files? I have the Desklink application
burned to
Post by David
CD if I want to install it on the XP computer but
I
Post by David
currently use it on my Tandy 1400HD to store my
Model
Post by David
100 files. I'd like to know if I could use the
cassette cable with the XP computer thus turning
it
Post by David
into a virtual recorder/player. Anyone out there
who
Post by David
could help with this idea?
Plus my Booster Pac is giving me problems again
and I
Post by David
think the battery is dying out.
David
__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing.
http://photos.yahoo.com/
__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing.
http://photos.yahoo.com/
Neil Morrison
2003-12-18 23:57:13 UTC
Permalink
That's not really the way to go. The files you download are not in
audio/data format. Better to transfer using a serial cable, or by
connecting a PDD to the PC.

Neil

----- Original Message -----
Post by David
So if I download stuff from Club100.org would I be
able to load files into the 100 from the XP? I'd like
to try using the cassette cable because I'm not sure
if my null modem cable will work on the XP machine. I
hate XP by the way.
JUST ME
2003-12-18 16:54:54 UTC
Permalink
Does this fit into that timeline somewhere?

"The first web browser - or browser-editor rather - was called WorldWideWeb as, after all, when it was written in 1990 it was the only way to see the web."

"At the time, the "X" close box was unique to NeXT, before Windows copied it."

Loading Image...

http://www.w3.org/MarkUp/tims_editor







.
----- Original Message -----
From: wb3fup-***@public.gmane.org
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 05:31:23 -0500
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Subject: Re: Under the hood -- Was: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by w***@public.gmane.org
Ron forgot the art about how Bill got Apple to pay him to steal the basics
for windows from them, after they bought it from Xerox. After Bill did his
thing at Apple, and while waiting for the air to clear a little he went to
IBM and convinced them to pay him big bucks for another operating system.
Once he had prooved the viability of GUI with OS/2 1.1 Bill took off, taking
all the candy that others had paid for with him. IBM continued with OS/2,
and from versions 2.3 forward it was a very stable, actual multi-tasking
platform with very few limits. I used it on a 386 machine with 4 megs of
ram. Could simultaneously send output to three printers from three
different programs, and be working in a fourth.
73 es cul
wb3fup
a Salty Bear
----- Original Message -----
Wrom: GAUTFJMVRESKPNKMBIPBARHDMNNSKVFV
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 19:20
Subject: Under the hood -- Was: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Ron Wiesen
Oh my God! You are indirectly revealing Bill Gates' long kept secret.
The
(no longer) secret is: deep down under the hood of every flavor of
Windoze,
where the rubber meets the road, you find (wait for it folks)..... QDOS
(Quick & Dirty Operating System).
A very long time ago Bill Gates purchased QDOS. He needed "some operating
system" so he could sell his BASIC interpreter to IBM. IBM was under the
illusion that Bill Gates had developed both a BASIC interpreter and an
operating system to support it. Bill hit up his dad for some bucks and
went
a few blocks to see his friend (who shall ever remain nameless) about
purchasing all rights to QDOS. Bucks were paid and Bill Gates became the
owner (never the developer) of QDOS. This cinched his deal with IBM.
First
came a cosmetic name change -- QDOS became MS-DOS (MicroSoft Disk
Operating
System). Then followed minor tinkering: DOS 2.0, DOS 3.0, and so on.
Around DOS 3.2 or thereabouts the tinkering caused more dysfunction than
function such that later versions of MS-DOS started to p... me off.
Around
DOS 6.0 it got real dysfunctional -- I got fully p...ed off.
Meanwhile back at MicroSoft, a few top folks with court order in hand paid
a
visit to MacIntosh headquarters. They peeked at all of the MacIntosh
stuff
under development. They were surprised to find an honest-to-goodness
operating system that was graphical. Returning to MicroSoft headquarters
they immediately began developing a graphical shell environment to sit
atop
DOS. They called it Windows. They still call it Windows. It still is
not
an operating system. Under the hood you still find an operating system --
QDOS.
The rest of the story now is history.
-= Ron =-
----- Original Message -----
Wrom: WRKJVZCMHVIBGDADRZFSQHYUCDDJBLVLMHAALPT
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 5:08 PM
Subject: Re: Tandy 102 and Windows XP
Post by Ron Hudson
Post by Ron Wiesen
Good. Now we know your plan. The null-modem drawings (Preferred or
Typical) will meet the requirements of DeskLink at the PC COM port and
TEENY.CO at the Model 102 RS-232C port. So the null-modem cable issue
has
been put to rest.
Your PC operating system (Op Sys) is Windows XP. Fine. That's not an
issue. The TEENY and DeskLink combination haas been used by folks
with
sundry flavors of Windows Op Sys (Win95, Win98, WinNT, Win2000, and so
on ad
nauseam). So the Op Sys of your PC is not an issue.
Can your desktop boot from a floppy? If you setup a floppy with DOS 6.x
and
reboot your desktop with it... do you have regular serial ports?
As long as you have regular serial ports and a bootable A: drive you
can setup
a Floppy with Desklink on it. I have done this (although the floppy is
MIA at
the moment [:^( ] ).
1234567891123456789212345678931234567894123456789512
--
___________________________________________________________
Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com
http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm
wenrin
2003-12-19 14:17:24 UTC
Permalink
<x-flowed>
This works in concept, but aren't there some issues with different file
types? I seem to remember when saving or loading
certain file types, the 10x would control the tape recorder. It would
start and stop the tape during the operation. You
only have audio in and out from the e-machine, no control. (Don't know
what the e-machine has port wise, but it might be
possible to make a MIDI/Joystick port, with suitable programming, to
provide the tape "data flow" to/from the e-machine.)


Nic









Hello everybody! I have a question in need of a good
answer. My mom has a e-machine that uses Windows XP
and it has a headphone jack as well as a microphone
jack. Since I use my Model 100 a lot I'm wondering if
it's possible to hook up the 100 to the XP computer
via the cassette cable so that I could load and/or
save files? I have the Desklink application burned to
CD if I want to install it on the XP computer but I
currently use it on my Tandy 1400HD to store my Model
100 files. I'd like to know if I could use the
cassette cable with the XP computer thus turning it
into a virtual recorder/player. Anyone out there who
could help with this idea?
Plus my Booster Pac is giving me problems again and I
think the battery is dying out.

David




</x-flowed>
David
2003-12-19 18:58:36 UTC
Permalink
The 100 can control a tape recorder but only if you
want it to. I never had the need to control a
recorder.

David
Post by wenrin
This works in concept, but aren't there some issues
with different file
types? I seem to remember when saving or loading
certain file types, the 10x would control the tape
recorder. It would
start and stop the tape during the operation. You
only have audio in and out from the e-machine, no
control. (Don't know
what the e-machine has port wise, but it might be
possible to make a MIDI/Joystick port, with
suitable programming, to
provide the tape "data flow" to/from the
e-machine.)
Nic
Hello everybody! I have a question in need of a
good
answer. My mom has a e-machine that uses Windows XP
and it has a headphone jack as well as a microphone
jack. Since I use my Model 100 a lot I'm wondering
if
it's possible to hook up the 100 to the XP computer
via the cassette cable so that I could load and/or
save files? I have the Desklink application burned
to
CD if I want to install it on the XP computer but I
currently use it on my Tandy 1400HD to store my
Model
100 files. I'd like to know if I could use the
cassette cable with the XP computer thus turning it
into a virtual recorder/player. Anyone out there
who
could help with this idea?
Plus my Booster Pac is giving me problems again and
I
think the battery is dying out.
David
__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing.
http://photos.yahoo.com/
Neil Morrison
2003-12-19 19:12:57 UTC
Permalink
In the rare cases where you need to control the tape machine while
loading (and they are very rare indeed) you would be better to dump
the whole audio file to tape then load it via a tape recorder.

Neil

----- Original Message -----
Post by wenrin
This works in concept, but aren't there some issues with different file
types? I seem to remember when saving or loading
certain file types, the 10x would control the tape recorder. It would
start and stop the tape during the operation....
David
2003-12-19 21:10:31 UTC
Permalink
Hey! I just found out that my moms XP computer has a
serial port on the back! That's rare. I hooked up my
100 and viola! It works! :)

David



__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing.
http://photos.yahoo.com/
Rod Dirk
2003-12-19 22:43:21 UTC
Permalink
Just saw this listed in the latest Lockgnome Windows' newsletter and thought
it might be a handy tool for anyone trying to troubleshoot serial port
connectivity between a Windows computer and M-100, 102 etc.

Serial Receptor v1.3.5

[438K]
Win98/2k/XP
FREE
http://jm.marino.free.fr/SPCSerialReceptor.html#aSRTop

{Capture data from serial port}
Serial Receptor is a tool enables you to capture all the data in reception
on all the RS232 port of your PC.

Replace your on line printer with Serial Receptor

a.. rotating buffer available,
b.. freeze view to search string in your data reception,
c.. multi com port available,
d.. replace LF or CR by CR+LF (useful under UNIX system...)
Best of the season and may Santa bring you lots of HO HO HO

Rod Dirk

----- Original Message -----
From: "David" <d3pl-/***@public.gmane.org>
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Sent: Friday, December 19, 2003 1:10 PM
Subject: Windows XP
Post by David
Hey! I just found out that my moms XP computer has a
serial port on the back! That's rare. I hooked up my
100 and viola! It works! :)
David
__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing.
http://photos.yahoo.com/
Stephen Hurd
2003-12-20 23:18:59 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 19 Dec 2003 13:10:31 -0800
Post by David
Hey! I just found out that my moms XP computer has a
serial port on the back! That's rare. I hooked up my
100 and viola! It works! :)
You know, people keep saying this is rare, but I have yet to see
a new PC without a serial port...
Neil Morrison
2003-12-20 23:22:44 UTC
Permalink
Why would you? There are many devices that still use that, and it
costs pennies to have. Same with the parallel port.

Neil

----- Original Message -----
Post by Stephen Hurd
You know, people keep saying this is rare, but I have yet to see
a new PC without a serial port...
Stephen Hurd
2003-12-21 00:15:12 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 15:22:44 -0800
Post by Neil Morrison
Why would you? There are many devices that still use that, and it
costs pennies to have. Same with the parallel port.
Neil
----- Original Message -----
Post by Stephen Hurd
You know, people keep saying this is rare, but I have yet to see
a new PC without a serial port...
Nod... I never expect to see one... or at least not until well after
I stop seeing floppy drives in new computers. I could be wrong though.
Russ Oechslin @ ink
2003-12-21 02:44:02 UTC
Permalink
Stephen Hurd
2003-12-21 02:54:11 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 20:44:02 -0600
There's no floppy in the new Dell, either
Post by Stephen Hurd
Nod... I never expect to see one... or at least not until well after
I stop seeing floppy drives in new computers. I could be wrong though.
Yes, but you still see them in around 60% of new systems... they haven't
completely died (yet)
Russ Oechslin @ ink
2003-12-21 02:43:10 UTC
Permalink
Stephen Hurd
2003-12-21 02:53:18 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 20:43:10 -0600
This is being written on a three-year-old Compaq Presario with no serial port.
Weird... I could have sworn that three years ago they all came with one...
would you mind telling me the model?
Just ordered a new Dell -- with no serial or printer port other than USB...
Hrm... again, would you be so kind as to mention the model? I still haven't
seen a single computer without a serial port... and I've worked on and with
a large number of Compaqs... not as many Dells though.
Russ Oechslin @ ink
2003-12-22 02:06:20 UTC
Permalink
Stephen Hurd
2003-12-21 02:57:39 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 20:43:10 -0600
This is being written on a three-year-old Compaq Presario with no serial port.
Just ordered a new Dell -- with no serial or printer port other than USB...
I take back part of my last post... I've seen a few laptops without serial...
Perhaps this was one of the Persario laptops?
Captain Davros
2003-12-20 21:06:43 UTC
Permalink
Hi all

I'm trying to make a male-male parallel cable to use with a switchbox so I
can print on different printers from the same computer. I'm following the
diagram here

http://www.electronic-engineering.ch/microchip/datasheets/pinout/pinout.html

But am cautious about what to do with pins 18 -25, which appear to be
"Signal Ground". Is this the same as the ground that is soldered to the
metal case of the plug (what I would call the shield), or is it something
different?

Any advice would be welcome.

Happy Holidays!

Jim D
Steve Adolph
2003-12-20 21:36:47 UTC
Permalink
signal ground and chassis ground are usually different I think. signal
ground would be ground on the PCB at the connector, and all signal voltages
are relative to that.

I have seen cables done both ways though, which can cause havoc when an
assumption is violated.

steve


----- Original Message -----
From: "Captain Davros" <captain.davros-J1btbF6uMEmsTnJN9+***@public.gmane.org>
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Sent: Saturday, December 20, 2003 4:06 PM
Subject: More cable questions...
Post by Captain Davros
Hi all
I'm trying to make a male-male parallel cable to use with a switchbox so I
can print on different printers from the same computer. I'm following the
diagram here
http://www.electronic-engineering.ch/microchip/datasheets/pinout/pinout.html
Post by Captain Davros
But am cautious about what to do with pins 18 -25, which appear to be
"Signal Ground". Is this the same as the ground that is soldered to the
metal case of the plug (what I would call the shield), or is it something
different?
Any advice would be welcome.
Happy Holidays!
Jim D
Neil Morrison
2003-12-20 21:53:18 UTC
Permalink
I think you can buy one at Office Max cheaper than you can make one.

Signal ground is not shield ground. Signal ground must be connected,
shield ground need not be.

NM

----- Original Message -----
Post by Captain Davros
Hi all
I'm trying to make a male-male parallel cable to use with a
switchbox so I
Post by Captain Davros
can print on different printers from the same computer. I'm
following the
Post by Captain Davros
diagram here
http://www.electronic-engineering.ch/microchip/datasheets/pinout/pinout.html
Post by Captain Davros
But am cautious about what to do with pins 18 -25, which appear to be
"Signal Ground". Is this the same as the ground that is soldered to the
metal case of the plug (what I would call the shield), or is it something
different?
Captain Davros
2003-12-20 21:57:58 UTC
Permalink
I wish I could - however I'm in the UK so no Office Max, and as it is it's
rapidly heading towards 2200 hrs!

I'm going to have another surf for clues; I'l let you know how I get on...

----- Original Message -----
From: "Neil Morrison" <neilsmorr-***@public.gmane.org>
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Sent: Saturday, December 20, 2003 9:53 PM
Subject: Re: More cable questions...
Post by Neil Morrison
I think you can buy one at Office Max cheaper than you can make one.
Signal ground is not shield ground. Signal ground must be connected,
shield ground need not be.
NM
----- Original Message -----
Post by Captain Davros
Hi all
I'm trying to make a male-male parallel cable to use with a
switchbox so I
Post by Captain Davros
can print on different printers from the same computer. I'm
following the
Post by Captain Davros
diagram here
http://www.electronic-engineering.ch/microchip/datasheets/pinout/pinout.html
Post by Neil Morrison
Post by Captain Davros
But am cautious about what to do with pins 18 -25, which appear to
be
Post by Captain Davros
"Signal Ground". Is this the same as the ground that is soldered
to the
Post by Captain Davros
metal case of the plug (what I would call the shield), or is it
something
Post by Captain Davros
different?
Neil Morrison
2003-12-20 22:45:45 UTC
Permalink
Ah, too bad. I think they're $8 or $10 there. What about the
elctronics stores in the UK? They have those massive catalogs.
Basically all signal grounds may be paralleled, but the shield ground
should only be connected to the shield ground.

Neil

Don't know if this helps, from the Tandy site, use a fixed pitch font
to read this:-

Printer Cable Extender (260-2840) Pinouts Faxback Doc. #
4262

Pin Assignment Table for active Signals:

Pin No. Name From Computer To Printer Remarks

1 /Strobe In Out
2-9 Data 0-Data 7 In Out
10 /Ack Out In
11 Busy Out In
12 PE Out In
13* Slct Out Out In IBM
/Busy Out In Tandy
14* /Auto Feed XT In Out IBM
Ground Tandy
15 NC Not Used Not Used
16 Ground
17 NC Not Used Not Used
18 NC Not Used Not Used
19-30 Ground
31* /Init In Out IBM
NC Not Used Not Used Tandy
32 /Error Out In
33* Ground IBM
/Init In Out Tandy
34 NC Not Used Not Used
35 NC Not Used Not Used
36 /Slct in In Out

Note: The usage of the connector pins marked * can be changed with a
slide switch to achieve the compatibility for both IBM and Tandy
printers.

Extender Cable for DB-25 TO 36-Pin Centronics

DB-25 Pin 36-Pin Centronics

1........................Strobe........................1
2........................Data Bit 0....................2
3........................Data Bit.1....................3
4........................Data Bit 2....................4
5........................Data Bit 3....................5
6........................Data.Bit.4....................6
7........................Data Bit 5....................7
8........................Data Bit 6....................8
9........................Data.Bit 7....................9
10.......................Acknowledge..................10
11.......................Busy.........................11
12.......................Paper End....................12
13.......................Select Out...................13
14.......................Auto Feed XT.................14
15.......................Error........................31
16.......................Initialize Printer...........32
17.......................Select Input.................36
18-25....................Ground............16, 19-30, 33


(jlc-07/20/93)

----- Original Message -----
Post by Captain Davros
I wish I could - however I'm in the UK so no Office Max, and as it is it's
rapidly heading towards 2200 hrs!
I'm going to have another surf for clues; I'l let you know how I get on...
Captain Davros
2003-12-20 23:37:01 UTC
Permalink
Thanks! So far things are not looking so hot with my homebrew cable. If
things don't perk up I will be trying one of the UK stores tomorrow (though
we seem to be pretty much changed over to USB these days on the printer
front so cables and so on are not so easy to find in average stores).

----- Original Message -----
From: "Neil Morrison" <neilsmorr-***@public.gmane.org>
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Sent: Saturday, December 20, 2003 10:45 PM
Subject: Re: More cable questions...
Post by Neil Morrison
Ah, too bad. I think they're $8 or $10 there. What about the
elctronics stores in the UK? They have those massive catalogs.
Basically all signal grounds may be paralleled, but the shield ground
should only be connected to the shield ground.
Neil
Don't know if this helps, from the Tandy site, use a fixed pitch font
to read this:-
Printer Cable Extender (260-2840) Pinouts Faxback Doc. #
4262
Pin No. Name From Computer To Printer Remarks
1 /Strobe In Out
2-9 Data 0-Data 7 In Out
10 /Ack Out In
11 Busy Out In
12 PE Out In
13* Slct Out Out In IBM
/Busy Out In Tandy
14* /Auto Feed XT In Out IBM
Ground Tandy
15 NC Not Used Not Used
16 Ground
17 NC Not Used Not Used
18 NC Not Used Not Used
19-30 Ground
31* /Init In Out IBM
NC Not Used Not Used Tandy
32 /Error Out In
33* Ground IBM
/Init In Out Tandy
34 NC Not Used Not Used
35 NC Not Used Not Used
36 /Slct in In Out
Note: The usage of the connector pins marked * can be changed with a
slide switch to achieve the compatibility for both IBM and Tandy
printers.
Extender Cable for DB-25 TO 36-Pin Centronics
DB-25 Pin 36-Pin Centronics
1........................Strobe........................1
2........................Data Bit 0....................2
3........................Data Bit.1....................3
4........................Data Bit 2....................4
5........................Data Bit 3....................5
6........................Data.Bit.4....................6
7........................Data Bit 5....................7
8........................Data Bit 6....................8
9........................Data.Bit 7....................9
10.......................Acknowledge..................10
11.......................Busy.........................11
12.......................Paper End....................12
13.......................Select Out...................13
14.......................Auto Feed XT.................14
15.......................Error........................31
16.......................Initialize Printer...........32
17.......................Select Input.................36
18-25....................Ground............16, 19-30, 33
(jlc-07/20/93)
----- Original Message -----
Post by Captain Davros
I wish I could - however I'm in the UK so no Office Max, and as it
is it's
Post by Captain Davros
rapidly heading towards 2200 hrs!
I'm going to have another surf for clues; I'l let you know how I
get on...
w***@public.gmane.org
2003-12-21 03:45:33 UTC
Permalink
Be sure that you get a cable designed for printers. Radio Shack (Tandy)
sells one, it is a bit pricey, but it is all 25 conductors wired straight
through. Avoid, like the black plague RS232 cables with DB25's on each end.
They probably only have 9 wires connected.

73 es cul

wb3fup
a Salty Bear


----- Original Message -----
Wrom: PTCXLYRWTQTIPWIGYOKSTTZRCLBDXRQBGJSNBOHMKHJY
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Sent: Saturday, December 20, 2003 18:37
Subject: Re: More cable questions...
Post by Captain Davros
Thanks! So far things are not looking so hot with my homebrew cable. If
things don't perk up I will be trying one of the UK stores tomorrow (though
we seem to be pretty much changed over to USB these days on the printer
front so cables and so on are not so easy to find in average stores).
----- Original Message -----
Wrom: FMYXOEAIJJPHSCRTNHGSWZIDREXCAXZOWCONEUQ
Sent: Saturday, December 20, 2003 10:45 PM
Subject: Re: More cable questions...
Post by Neil Morrison
Ah, too bad. I think they're $8 or $10 there. What about the
elctronics stores in the UK? They have those massive catalogs.
Basically all signal grounds may be paralleled, but the shield ground
should only be connected to the shield ground.
Neil
Don't know if this helps, from the Tandy site, use a fixed pitch font
to read this:-
Printer Cable Extender (260-2840) Pinouts Faxback Doc. #
4262
Pin No. Name From Computer To Printer Remarks
1 /Strobe In Out
2-9 Data 0-Data 7 In Out
10 /Ack Out In
11 Busy Out In
12 PE Out In
13* Slct Out Out In IBM
/Busy Out In Tandy
14* /Auto Feed XT In Out IBM
Ground Tandy
15 NC Not Used Not Used
16 Ground
17 NC Not Used Not Used
18 NC Not Used Not Used
19-30 Ground
31* /Init In Out IBM
NC Not Used Not Used Tandy
32 /Error Out In
33* Ground IBM
/Init In Out Tandy
34 NC Not Used Not Used
35 NC Not Used Not Used
36 /Slct in In Out
Note: The usage of the connector pins marked * can be changed with a
slide switch to achieve the compatibility for both IBM and Tandy
printers.
Extender Cable for DB-25 TO 36-Pin Centronics
DB-25 Pin 36-Pin Centronics
1........................Strobe........................1
2........................Data Bit 0....................2
3........................Data Bit.1....................3
4........................Data Bit 2....................4
5........................Data Bit 3....................5
6........................Data.Bit.4....................6
7........................Data Bit 5....................7
8........................Data Bit 6....................8
9........................Data.Bit 7....................9
10.......................Acknowledge..................10
11.......................Busy.........................11
12.......................Paper End....................12
13.......................Select Out...................13
14.......................Auto Feed XT.................14
15.......................Error........................31
16.......................Initialize Printer...........32
17.......................Select Input.................36
18-25....................Ground............16, 19-30, 33
(jlc-07/20/93)
----- Original Message -----
Wrom: ZAAFXISHJEXXIMQZUIVOTQNQEMSFDULHPQQWOYIYZUNN
Post by Captain Davros
I wish I could - however I'm in the UK so no Office Max, and as it
is it's
Post by Captain Davros
rapidly heading towards 2200 hrs!
I'm going to have another surf for clues; I'l let you know how I
get on...
Captain Davros
2003-12-21 11:56:13 UTC
Permalink
Aha, yes, I think that's what I got yesterday; it was a db25-db25 cable from
a £1 box at a computer fair, but the hoods were not moulded and could be
opened. I spent about an hour re-wiring it last night (not a big deal
really) but I don't have enough wires for every pin between 18-25, hence my
query about how to proceed there.

Now, I do have a parallel link cable that allows 2 pcs to be connected that
way - is it worth looking for that before I go out and look for another one?


----- Original Message -----
From: <wb3fup-***@public.gmane.org>
To: <m100-***@public.gmane.org>
Sent: Sunday, December 21, 2003 3:45 AM
Subject: Re: More cable questions...
Post by w***@public.gmane.org
Be sure that you get a cable designed for printers. Radio Shack (Tandy)
sells one, it is a bit pricey, but it is all 25 conductors wired straight
through. Avoid, like the black plague RS232 cables with DB25's on each end.
They probably only have 9 wires connected.
73 es cul
wb3fup
a Salty Bear
----- Original Message -----
Wrom: PTCXLYRWTQTIPWIGYOKSTTZRCLBDXRQBGJSNBOHMKHJY
Sent: Saturday, December 20, 2003 18:37
Subject: Re: More cable questions...
Post by Captain Davros
Thanks! So far things are not looking so hot with my homebrew cable.
If
Post by w***@public.gmane.org
Post by Captain Davros
things don't perk up I will be trying one of the UK stores tomorrow (though
we seem to be pretty much changed over to USB these days on the printer
front so cables and so on are not so easy to find in average stores).
----- Original Message -----
Wrom: FMYXOEAIJJPHSCRTNHGSWZIDREXCAXZOWCONEUQ
Sent: Saturday, December 20, 2003 10:45 PM
Subject: Re: More cable questions...
Post by Neil Morrison
Ah, too bad. I think they're $8 or $10 there. What about the
elctronics stores in the UK? They have those massive catalogs.
Basically all signal grounds may be paralleled, but the shield ground
should only be connected to the shield ground.
Neil
Don't know if this helps, from the Tandy site, use a fixed pitch font
to read this:-
Printer Cable Extender (260-2840) Pinouts Faxback Doc. #
4262
Pin No. Name From Computer To Printer Remarks
1 /Strobe In Out
2-9 Data 0-Data 7 In Out
10 /Ack Out In
11 Busy Out In
12 PE Out In
13* Slct Out Out In IBM
/Busy Out In Tandy
14* /Auto Feed XT In Out IBM
Ground Tandy
15 NC Not Used Not Used
16 Ground
17 NC Not Used Not Used
18 NC Not Used Not Used
19-30 Ground
31* /Init In Out IBM
NC Not Used Not Used Tandy
32 /Error Out In
33* Ground IBM
/Init In Out Tandy
34 NC Not Used Not Used
35 NC Not Used Not Used
36 /Slct in In Out
Note: The usage of the connector pins marked * can be changed with a
slide switch to achieve the compatibility for both IBM and Tandy
printers.
Extender Cable for DB-25 TO 36-Pin Centronics
DB-25 Pin 36-Pin Centronics
1........................Strobe........................1
2........................Data Bit 0....................2
3........................Data Bit.1....................3
4........................Data Bit 2....................4
5........................Data Bit 3....................5
6........................Data.Bit.4....................6
7........................Data Bit 5....................7
8........................Data Bit 6....................8
9........................Data.Bit 7....................9
10.......................Acknowledge..................10
11.......................Busy.........................11
12.......................Paper End....................12
13.......................Select Out...................13
14.......................Auto Feed XT.................14
15.......................Error........................31
16.......................Initialize Printer...........32
17.......................Select Input.................36
18-25....................Ground............16, 19-30, 33
(jlc-07/20/93)
----- Original Message -----
Wrom: ZAAFXISHJEXXIMQZUIVOTQNQEMSFDULHPQQWOYIYZUNN
Post by Captain Davros
I wish I could - however I'm in the UK so no Office Max, and as it
is it's
Post by Captain Davros
rapidly heading towards 2200 hrs!
I'm going to have another surf for clues; I'l let you know how I
get on...
Ron Wiesen
2003-12-21 16:43:26 UTC
Permalink
The original Centronics standard meets various military specifications
(MIL-spec). The standard requires 17 signal conductors and their 17 circuit
return conductors. That's a total of 34 conductors to satisfy the
electrical transmission needs of 17 circuits. Allowing for 1 equipment
frame ground conductor and 1 earth conductor, the final total is 36
conductors required. Transmission line characteristics are included in the
standard -- twisted pairs of cable conductors are used where a circuit
return conductor is paired with each signal conductor. The standard also
specifies a cable with a circular cross section and the spatial distribution
of all conductors within that cross section. The transmission line
characteristics and the distribution of cable conductors, to a large extent,
minimizes and equalizes radiant cross-talk among the 17 circuits and radiant
interference from or to nearby cables that terminate on unrelated equipment.
This robust standard, albeit costly, satisfies all MIL-spec requirements and
it performs well for extremely long cable runs through radiant-rich
electrical environments.

There also is a TEMPEST certified Centronics standard. In contrast to the
original Centronics standard which maximizes cable run length, the TEMPEST
certified standard aims to minimize radiation from (not toward) the cable.
Each of the 17 twisted pairs has a surrounding conductive sheath (e.g.,
braided sleeve). Each cable-end has a unique arrangment to bond together
the sheaths. The printer side cable-end bonds only those sheaths that
surround twisted pairs which carry transmission signals generated by the
printer (e.g., Busy). Likewise, there's a unique sheath bond arrangment for
the opposite end of the cable. Unlike the original Centronics standard
where (assuming identical connectors and pinouts) either cable-end may
attach to the printer, the TEMPEST certified standard has dedicated
cable-ends. Also there are no cable through-conductors for frame ground or
earth purposes. Certain U.S. military land-, ship-, and aircraft-based
installations use the TEMPEST certified standard. Sorry, I can't give you
any more detail or cite an installation because I then would have to kill
you.

For reduced cost in commercial use, there is a less robust Centronics
standard. This standard has very little to do with the cable and much to do
with pinouts where one cable-end has less than 36 conductors (e.g., 25).
All this standard amounts to is a recommended minmum total of 4 conductors
in use as a "collective" circuit return conductor shared by all 17 circuits.
Allowing for 1 equipment frame ground conductor and 1 earth conductor, the
final total is a recommended minmum of 23 conductors required (17 + 4 + 1 +
1) in the cable. If the cable is kept short in length, it will work well
enough despite its lack of individual circuit return conductors. See below
for an example where the cable has 25 conductors. What's designated as
"Ground" in the example is an unfortunate misnomer that can represent: the
circuit return conductors, the frame ground conductor, or the earth
conductor. Note this misnomer relates to 8 pins at the DB-25 connector, and
to 14 pins at the 36-pin connector.
Post by Neil Morrison
Extender Cable for DB-25 TO 36-Pin Centronics
DB-25 Pin 36-Pin Centronics
1........................Strobe........................1
2........................Data Bit 0....................2
3........................Data Bit.1....................3
4........................Data Bit 2....................4
5........................Data Bit 3....................5
6........................Data.Bit.4....................6
7........................Data Bit 5....................7
8........................Data Bit 6....................8
9........................Data.Bit 7....................9
10.......................Acknowledge..................10
11.......................Busy.........................11
12.......................Paper End....................12
13.......................Select Out...................13
14.......................Auto Feed XT.................14
15.......................Error........................31
16.......................Initialize Printer...........32
17.......................Select Input.................36
18-25....................Ground............16, 19-30, 33
-= Ron =-
Neil Morrison
2003-12-21 17:17:58 UTC
Permalink
----- Original Message -----
Post by Captain Davros
Aha, yes, I think that's what I got yesterday; it was a db25-db25 cable from
a £1 box at a computer fair, but the hoods were not moulded and could be
opened. I spent about an hour re-wiring it last night (not a big deal
really) but I don't have enough wires for every pin between 18-25, hence my
query about how to proceed there.
As long as one or more signal grounds are connected you should be OK.
The multiple grounds was supposed to provide a form of shielding, but
I doubt it's critical. Interestingly the M100 printer cable used only
one or two grounds.

NM
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